• Japan
  • 1968
  • 80 minutes
  • Color
  • 2.35:1
  • Japanese
  •  

A trio of bumbling young men frolic at the beach. While they swim, their clothes are stolen and replaced with new outfits. Donning these, they are mistaken for undocumented Koreans and end up on the run from comically outraged authorities. A cutting commentary on Japan’s treatment of its Korean immigrants, this is Nagisa Oshima at both his most politically engaged and madcap.

Cast

O-noppo Kazuhiko Kato
ChibiNorihiko Hashida
Chu-noppoOsamu Kitayama
Korean soldierKei Sato
NechanMako Midori

Film Essays

Eclipse Series 21: Oshima’s Outlaw Sixties

By Michael Koresky May 20, 2010

DRIVEN TO DESTRUCTION Nagisa Oshima was a destructive force in Japanese cinema—and he wouldn’t have had it any other way. Intent on exploding taboos and jabbing the eye of the status quo, he . . . Read more »

Announcements


Press Notes

Press Notes: 2010—One Last Look

January 03, 2011

Before we put 2010 to bed, we thought we’d catch up with all the year-end lists that have sprung up over the past week or so. A good place to start is DVD Beaver’s annual poll, which ranks the . . . Read more »


Press Notes

Press Notes: Looking Back at 2010

December 22, 2010

Sight & Sound’s annual poll of the year’s best DVD (and Blu-ray) releases is out, and this edition features choices from twenty-four “contributors, DVD distributors, and curators.” We’re . . . Read more »


Press Notes

Press Notes: Oshima’s Outlaw Sixties

May 28, 2010

The teeming talent and copious output of Japanese filmmaker Nagisa Oshima may have resulted in a body of work that’s stylistically mercurial, but his thematic preoccupations have been steadfast: . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 21: Oshima’s Outlaw Sixties

By Michael Koresky May 20, 2010

DRIVEN TO DESTRUCTION Nagisa Oshima was a destructive force in Japanese cinema—and he wouldn’t have had it any other way. Intent on exploding taboos and jabbing the eye of the status quo, he . . . Read more »


News

Kei Sato 1928–2010

By Chuck Stephens May 11, 2010

The great Japanese actor Kei Sato passed away last week; he was eighty-one years old. You may not recognize Sato’s name, but if you’ve seen a Japanese film in the past fifty years, there’s a . . . Read more »