Jacques Becker

Casque d’or

Casque d’or

Jacques Becker lovingly evokes the belle epoque Parisian demimonde in this classic tale of doomed romance. When gangster's moll Marie (Simone Signoret) falls for reformed criminal Manda (Serge Reggiani), their passion incites an underworld rivalry that leads inexorably to treachery and tragedy. With poignant, nuanced performances and sensuous black-and-white photography, Casque d'or (Golden Marie) is Becker at the height of his cinematic powers—a romantic masterpiece.

Film Info

  • Jacques Becker
  • France
  • 1952
  • 94 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • French
  • Spine #270

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie
  • 1995 video interview with actor Serge Reggiani
  • 1963 interview with actress Simone Signoret from the French television program Cinepanorama
  • Excerpt from an episode of the French television series Cineastes de notre temps, dedicated to Jacques Becker
  • Rare, silent behind-the-scenes footage of Becker on the set, with commentary by film scholar Philip Kemp
  • New essay by Kemp
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

New cover by Christine Ditrio

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie
  • 1995 video interview with actor Serge Reggiani
  • 1963 interview with actress Simone Signoret from the French television program Cinepanorama
  • Excerpt from an episode of the French television series Cineastes de notre temps, dedicated to Jacques Becker
  • Rare, silent behind-the-scenes footage of Becker on the set, with commentary by film scholar Philip Kemp
  • New essay by Kemp
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

New cover by Christine Ditrio

Casque d’or
Cast
Simone Signoret
Marie
Serge Reggiani
Georges Manda
Claude Dauphin
Felix Leca
Raymond Bussières
Raymond
Gaston Modot
Danard
Paul Barge
Police Inspector Giuliani
Dominique Davray
Julie
Credits
Director
Jacques Becker
Producer
Robert Hakim
Production manager
Henri Baum
Screenplay
Jacques Becker
Screenplay
Jacques Companeez
Adaptation and dialogue
Jacques Becker
Cinematography
Robert Le Febvre
Editing
Marguerite Renoir
Sound
Antoine Petitjean
Costume design
Mayo
Assistant director
Marcel Camus
Music
Georges van Parys

From The Current

Aki Kaurismäki’s Top 10

Our favorite Finn didn’t have an easy time picking his ten favorite titles in the Criterion Collection.


Oct 21, 2011
BAZIN UNBURIED

Here’s a definite must-read: in its latest issue, Bright Lights Film Journal features André Bazin’s essay “Fifteen Years of French Cinema,” in its first-ever English translation (by Bert Cardullo). Originally delivered as a lecture in 1957, …


May 15, 2009
Casque d’or: Tenderness and Violence

Along with Touchez pas au grisbi and Le Trou, Casque d’or is now widely recognized as the summit of Jacques Becker’s achievement as a filmmaker, a distillation of everything that’s most personal and central to his vision. All the more surprisin…

By Philip Kemp


Jan 18, 2005

Explore

Simone Signoret

Actor

With her sultry sensuality, catlike features, and penetrating intelligence, Simone Signoret graced French cinema for more than thirty years. Throughout her film career, which began after World War II ended, this chameleonic talent shifted effortlessly between fierce imperiousness and affecting vulnerability, often within the same role. The product of a family of intellectuals, Signoret (née Kaminker—she switched to her mother’s maiden name during the war to obscure her Jewish roots) was the thinking man’s sex symbol. In the 1950s, she was known as much for the leftist politics she and her husband, Yves Montand (they were married until her death in 1985), outspokenly embraced as for such movies as La ronde, Casque d’or, and Diabolique. In 1959, she became the first French actress to win an Oscar, for the British crossover sensation Room at the Top. Her performance in that film as an unhappily married woman having an affair would prove iconic—years later, Time wrote that she was “everywoman’s Bogart, in a trench coat, dangling a cigarette.” Signoret continued to choose strong films during the sixties and seventies, including Stanley Kramer’s Ship of Fools (another Oscar nomination), Jean-Pierre Melville’s Army of Shadows, and Costa-Gavras’s The Confession. In her last decade, she turned to writing, including her popular autobiography, Nostalgia Isn’t What It Used to Be, and a novel, Adieu, Volodya.