• United States
  • 1950
  • 97 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  •  

In one of his own favorite roles, Vincent Price portrays legendary swindler James Addison Reavis, who in 1880 concocted an elaborate and dangerous hoax to name himself the “Baron” of Arizona, and therefore inherit all the land in the state. Samuel Fuller adapts this tall tale to film with fleet, elegant storytelling and a sly sense of humor.

Cast

James Addison ReavisVincent Price
Sofia de Peralta-ReavisEllen Drew
Pepito AlvarezVladimir Sokoloff
Lorna MoralesBeulah Bondi
John GriffReed Hadley
Judge AdamsRobert H. Barrat
LansingRobin Short
RitaTina Rome
Sofia, as a childKaren Kester
MarquesaMargia Dean
GovernerJonathan Hale
Surveyor MillerEdward Keane

Credits

DirectorSamuel Fuller
ProducerCarl K. Hittleman
CinematographyJames Wong Howe
Art directionF. Paul Sylos
Special effectsRay Mercer
MusicPaul Dunlap
EditingArthur Hilton

Film Essays

Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller

By Nick Pinkerton August 13, 2007

Instead of calling “Action!” Samuel Fuller discharged a Colt .45 in the air. It was the first scene he had ever directed, on the set of I Shot Jesse James (1949), and he knew the importance of a . . . Read more »

Book Notes

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Juice, with Lots of Pulp: Samuel Fuller’s Brainquake

By Michael Atkinson November 05, 2014

A review of the American auteur’s posthumously published novel Read more »


From the Eclipse Shelf


Book Notes

Me and Sam Fuller

By Lisa Dombrowski December 29, 2008

It is a good time to belong to the cult of Fuller. Those of us who consider ourselves members never forget our moment of induction. Some enlisted when his films first hit the screen—lucky enough . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller

By Nick Pinkerton August 13, 2007

Instead of calling “Action!” Samuel Fuller discharged a Colt .45 in the air. It was the first scene he had ever directed, on the set of I Shot Jesse James (1949), and he knew the importance of a . . . Read more »

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