Louis Malle

Lacombe, Lucien

Lacombe, Lucien

One of the first French films to address the issue of collaboration during the German occupation, Louis Malle’s brave and controversial Lacombe, Lucien traces a young peasant’s journey from potential Resistance member to Gestapo recruit. At once the story of a nation and one troubled boy, the film is a disquieting portrait of lost innocence and guilt.

Film Info

  • Louis Malle
  • France
  • 1974
  • 138 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.66:1
  • French
  • Spine #329

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Pauline Kael’s 1974 New Yorker review
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

New cover by Michael Boland

Purchase Options

Collector's Sets

Collector's Set

3 Films by Louis Malle

3 Films by Louis Malle

DVD Box Set

4 Discs

Ships Jul 16, 2018

$63.96

Out Of Print

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Pauline Kael’s 1974 New Yorker review
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

New cover by Michael Boland

Lacombe, Lucien
Cast
Pierre Blaise
Lucien Lacombe
Aurore Clément
France Horn
Holger Löwenadler
Albert Horn
Thérèse Giehse
Bella Horn
Stéphane Bouy
Jean-Bernard
Credits
Director
Louis Malle
Screenplay
Louis Malle
Screenplay
Patrick Modiano
Producer
Louis Malle
Producer
Claude Nedjar
Cinematography
Tonino Delli Colli
Music
Charles Gounod
Music
Django Reinhardt

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Lacombe, Lucien

From Pauline Kael's 1974 New Yorker review. Reprinted with permission from the New Yorker. Introducing himself to a delicate, fine-boned parisienne, the farm-boy hero of Louis Malle’s new movie does not give his name as Lucien Lacombe; he gives t…

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Explore

Louis Malle

Writer, Producer, Director

Crime dramas, comedies, romances, tragedies, fantasies, documentaries, and, of course, coming-of-age stories­—director Louis Malle did it all. This most unpredictable and eclectic of filmmakers enriched cinema over a nearly forty-year career that took him from Jacques Cousteau’s watery depths (his first film was the Cousteau-codirected Oscar winner The Silent World) to the peripheries of the French New Wave (Zazie dans le métro, The Fire Within) to the vanguard of American moviemaking (My Dinner with André). Malle had an intellectually curious nature that led him to approach film from a variety of angles; he was as comfortable making minimalist works like the wordless Humain trop humain and the talky André as phantasmagorical ones like Black Moon. He is probably best known, though, for his deeply personal films about the terrors and confusions of childhood, such as Murmur of the Heart and Au revoir les enfants. Perhaps not as well-known is his parallel career as a master of the nonfiction form—one of his many documentary achievements was the seven-part Phantom India, which would be a stunning career centerpiece for anyone else; for this director, it was simply a fascinating side project. Malle died in 1995, shortly after directing his final film, the typically experimental Vanya on 42nd Street.