Akira Kurosawa

The Bad Sleep Well

The Bad Sleep Well

A young executive hunts down his father’s killer in director Akira Kurosawa’s scathing The Bad Sleep Well. Continuing his legendary collaboration with actor Toshiro Mifune, Kurosawa combines elements of Hamlet and American film noir to chilling effect in exposing the corrupt boardrooms of postwar corporate Japan.

Film Info

  • Akira Kurosawa
  • Japan
  • 1960
  • 150 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 2.35:1
  • Japanese
  • Spine #319

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • A 33-minute documentary on the making of The Bad Sleep Well, created as part of the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved subtitle translation
  • New essays by film critic Chuck Stephens and director Michael Almereyda (Deadwood, Hamlet)

New cover by Eric Skillman

Purchase Options

Collector's Sets

Collector's Set

AK 100: 25 Films by Akira Kurosawa

AK 100: 25 Films by Kurosawa

DVD Box Set

25 Discs

Ships Oct 12, 2018

$319.00

Out Of Print

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • A 33-minute documentary on the making of The Bad Sleep Well, created as part of the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved subtitle translation
  • New essays by film critic Chuck Stephens and director Michael Almereyda (Deadwood, Hamlet)

New cover by Eric Skillman

The Bad Sleep Well
Cast
Toshiro Mifune
Koichi Nishi
Masayuki Mori
Public Corporation Vice President Iwabuchi
Tatsuya Mihashi
Tatsuo Iwabuchi
Takashi Shimura
Moriyama
Kyoko Kagawa
Keiko Nishi
Kô Nishimura
Contract Officer Shirai
Takeshi Kato
Itakura
Kamatari Fujiwara
Assistant-to-the-Chief Wada
Chishu Ryu
Public Prosecutor Nonaka
Credits
Director
Akira Kurosawa
Screenplay
Shinobu Hashimoto
Screenplay
Eijiro Hisaita
Screenplay
Ryuzo Kikushima
Screenplay
Hideo Oguni
Screenplay
Akira Kurosawa
Producer
Akira Kurosawa
Producer
Tomoyuki Tanaka
Music
Masaru Sato
Cinematography
Yuzuru Aizawa
Editing
Akira Kurosawa
Production design
Yoshiro Muraki
Costume design
Shoji Kurihara

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Akira Kurosawa died in September of 1998, a month before I began shooting a humble, contemporary version of Hamlet set in Manhattan and filmed on Super 16mm. Another A. K.—Aki Kaurismaki—provided a more provocative influence with his Hamlet Goes …

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Kurosawa in Toronto

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Kurosawa in Toronto

This week, the TIFF Cinematheque in Toronto will show Akira Kurosawa’s 1960 dramatic thriller The Bad Sleep Well as part of its summer series of special screenings. Starring the Japanese screen icon and longtime Kurosawa collaborator Toshiro Mifune…

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The Bad Sleep Well: The Higher Depths

A gray flannel ghost story in which the living haunt the dead, The Bad Sleep Well (1960) remains the least appreciated of Akira Kuro-sawa’s midperiod collaborations with Toshiro Mifune—a fate for which we have only the other Kurosawa-Mifune films…

By Chuck Stephens


Explore

Akira Kurosawa

Writer, Producer, Director

Arguably the most celebrated Japanese filmmaker of all time, Akira Kurosawa had a career that spanned from the Second World War to the early nineties and that stands as a monument of artistic, entertainment, and personal achievement. His best-known films remain his samurai epics Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, but his intimate dramas, such as Ikiru and High and Low, are just as searing. The first serious phase of Kurosawa’s career came during the postwar era, with Drunken Angel and Stray Dog, gritty dramas about people on the margins of society that featured the first notable appearances by Toshiro Mifune, the director’s longtime leading man. Kurosawa would subsequently gain international fame with Rashomon, a breakthrough in nonlinear narrative and sumptuous visuals. Following a personal breakdown in the late sixties, Kurosawa rebounded by expanding his dark brand of humanism into new stylistic territory, with films such as Kagemusha and Ran, visionary, color, epic ruminations on modern man and nature.