Federico Fellini

Intervista

Intervista

Something of a late-career companion to 8½, Federico Fellini’s penultimate film is a similarly self-reflexive (and self-deprecating) journey through both the director’s dream life and his cinematic world—which are, here as always in Fellini’s work, inextricably entwined. In Rome to make a documentary about the great filmmaker, a Japanese camera crew follows Fellini on a tour through his longtime home studio of Cinecittà as the maestro’s memories and fantasies unfurl in a dizzying, dazzling, time-bending love letter to the art and spectacle of moviemaking. The film’s sprawling vision even makes room for an appearance by Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg who, in an unforgettable bit of movie magic, relive their iconic Trevi Fountain scene from La dolce vita, lent new poignancy by the tacit acknowledgement of time’s passing.

Film Info

  • Federico Fellini
  • Italy
  • 1987
  • 106 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.37:1
  • Italian, Japanese, English

Available In

Collector's Set

Essential Fellini

Essential Fellini

Blu-Ray Box Set

15 Discs

$199.96

Intervista
Cast
Sergio Rubini
Reporter/Sergio Rubini
Antonella Ponziani
Antonella
Maurizio Mein
Himself
Paola Liguori
Star
Lara Wendel
Bride
Antonio Cantafora
Spouse
Nadia Ottaviani
Vestal Virgin
Anita Ekberg
Herself
Marcello Mastroianni
Himself
Credits
Director
Federico Fellini
Story and screenplay
Federico Fellini
Contributing writer
Gianfranco Angelucci
Cinematography
Tonino Delli Colli
Editing
Nino Baragli
Music
Nicola Piovani
Production design and costumes
Danilo Donati
Producer
Ibrahim Moussa

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Federico Fellini

Writer, Director

Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini

One of Italy’s great modern directors, Federico Fellini was a larger-than-life maestro who created an inimitable cinematic style combining surreal carnival with incisive social critique. While his most popular—and accessible—film, the darkly nostalgic childhood memoir Amarcord, is a great entryway into his oeuvre, , a collage of memories, dreams, and fantasies about a director’s artistic crisis, is perhaps his masterpiece. In his early career, Fellini was both a screenwriter for neorealist pioneer Roberto Rossellini and a newspaper caricaturist in postwar Rome, competing influences he would bring together with startling results. After such early works as I vitelloni, Fellini broke away from neorealism’s political strictures with the beloved La strada, and from there boldly explored his obsessions with the circus, societal decadence, spiritual redemption, and, most controversially, women, in such films as Nights of Cabiria, Juliet of the Spirits, and And the Ship Sails On.