Med Hondo

Soleil Ô

Soleil Ô

A furious cry of resistance against racist oppression and a revolutionary landmark of political cinema, this feature debut from Mauritanian director Med Hondo is a bitterly funny, dazzlingly experimental attack on capitalism and the legacy of colonialism. Soleil Ô follows a starry-eyed immigrant as he leaves West Africa and journeys to Paris in search of a job, a community, and intellectual engagement—but soon discovers a hostile society where his very presence engenders fear and resentment. With this freewheeling masterpiece, Hondo crafts a shattering vision of awakening Black consciousness.

Film Info

  • Med Hondo
  • France, Mauritania
  • 1970
  • 102 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.37:1
  • French, Arabic
  • Spine #1049

Available In

Collector's Set

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Blu-Ray/DVD Combo Box Set

9 Discs

$99.96

Soleil Ô
Cast
Robert Liensol
Théo Légitimus
Gabriel Glissant
Graig Germain
Mabousso Lô
Alfred Panou
Les Black Echos
Ambroise M’Bia
Akonio Dolo
Jean-Baptiste Tiemele
Georges Hilarion
Djibrill
Jean Edmond
Armand Meffre
Gérard Hernandez
Bernard Fresson
Gilles Ségal
Odette Piquet
Yane Barry
Sarah Hardenberg
Michèle Perello
Credits
Director
Med Hondo
Screenplay
Med Hondo
Director of photography
François Catonné
Editor
Michèle Masnier
Editor
Clément Menuet
Music
Georges Anderson
Additional songs by
Jean-Paul Drouet
Additional songs by
Michel Portal
Additional songs by
Les Black Echos
Sound
Jean-Paul Loublier
Sound
Yves Allard
Sound
Alain Contrault
Set design
Med Hondo
Camera
Denis Bertrand
Camera
François Pailleux
Animation
Jean-François Laguionie
Stills photographer
Pio Santini
Stills photographer
François Catonné

From The Current

Soleil Ô: “I Bring You Greetings from Africa”

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Soleil Ô: “I Bring You Greetings from Africa

With his deeply political but unclassifiable debut feature, Med Hondo set out to establish a transformational presence for global African cinema and to accelerate the emergence of a new Africa.

By Aboubakar Sanogo