Andrei Tarkovsky

Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Tracing the life of a renowned icon painter, the second feature by Andrei Tarkovsky vividly conjures the murky world of medieval Russia. This dreamlike and remarkably tactile film follows Andrei Rublev as he passes through a series of poetically linked scenes—snow falls inside an unfinished church, naked pagans stream through a thicket during a torchlit ritual, a boy oversees the clearing away of muddy earth for the forging of a gigantic bell—gradually emerging as a man struggling mightily to preserve his creative and religious integrity. Appearing here in the director’s preferred 183-minute cut as well as the version that was originally suppressed by Soviet authorities, the masterwork Andrei Rublev is one of Tarkovsky’s most revered films, an arresting meditation on art, faith, and endurance.


Film Info

  • Andrei Tarkovsky
  • Soviet Union
  • 1966
  • 183 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 2.35:1
  • Russian
  • Spine #34

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration of the director’s preferred 183-minute cut, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • The Passion According to Andrei, the original 205-minute version of the film
  • The Steamroller and the Violin, Tarkovsky’s 1961 student thesis film
  • The Three Andreis, a 1966 documentary about the writing of the film’s script
  • On the Set of “Andrei Rublev,” a 1966 documentary about the making of the film
  • Tarkovsky’s “Andrei Rublev”: A Journey, a new documentary by filmmakers Seán Martin and Louise Milne, featuring interviews with actor Nikolai Burlyaev, cinematographer Vadim Yusov, Tarkovsky’s assistant Olga Surkova, and others
  • New interview with film scholar Robert Bird
  • Selected-scene commentary from 1998 featuring film scholar Vlada Petrić
  • New video essay by filmmaker Daniel Raim
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic J. Hoberman

New cover by Nessim Higson

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration of the director’s preferred 183-minute cut, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • The Passion According to Andrei, the original 205-minute version of the film
  • The Steamroller and the Violin, Tarkovsky’s 1961 student thesis film
  • The Three Andreis, a 1966 documentary about the writing of the film’s script
  • On the Set of “Andrei Rublev,” a 1966 documentary about the making of the film
  • Tarkovsky’s “Andrei Rublev”: A Journey, a new documentary by filmmakers Seán Martin and Louise Milne, featuring interviews with actor Nikolai Burlyaev, cinematographer Vadim Yusov, Tarkovsky’s assistant Olga Surkova, and others
  • New interview with film scholar Robert Bird
  • Selected-scene commentary from 1998 featuring film scholar Vlada Petrić
  • New video essay by filmmaker Daniel Raim
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic J. Hoberman

New cover by Nessim Higson

Andrei Rublev
Cast
Anatoly Solonitsyn
Andrei Rublev
Ivan Lapikov
Kirill
Nikolai Grinko
Danil Chorny
Nikolai Sergeyev
Theophanes the Greek
Irma Raush
Durochka
Credits
Director
Andrei Tarkovsky
Screenplay
Andrei Tarkovsky
Screenplay
Andrei Konchalovsky
Producer
Tamara Ogorodnikova
Cinematography
Vadim Yusov
Music
Viacheslav Ovchinnikov
Editing
Ludmila Feignova

From The Current

In the Words of Tarkovsky
In the Words of Tarkovsky

In this contemplative moment from a documentary about Andrei Tarkovsky, the elusive master explains how he tried to conjure an immersive vision of painter Andrei Rublev’s world.

Andrei Rublev: An Icon Emerges
Andrei Rublev: An Icon Emerges
On one hand, Rublev is founded on the conflict between austere Christianity and sensual paganism—whether Slavic or Tatar. On the other, it puts the artist in the context of state patronage and repression. When he stumbles upon the mysteri…

By J. Hoberman

Ali Abbasi’s Top 10
Tarkovsky’s Medieval Masterpiece Returns to the Big Screen

Repertory Picks

Tarkovsky’s Medieval Masterpiece Returns to the Big Screen

One of Andrei Tarkovsky’s most powerful meditations on art and spirituality opens this weekend in New York in a gorgeous new restoration.

From the Tarkovsky Archives
From the Tarkovsky Archives

On what would have been his eighty-sixth birthday, we’re celebrating Andrei Tarkvosky’s legacy with a look back at some of the essays and videos we’ve published on his work.

Reconsidering Tomu Uchida, American Genre Film Archive, Fosse’s Swan Song

Reconsidering Tomu Uchida, American Genre Film Archive, Fosse’s Swan Song

For Film Comment, Marc Walkow surveys the career of director Tomu Uchida, currently the subject of a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. Like many commercial Japanese directors of his era, Uchida has long been underappreciated in the West, but…