Federico Fellini

Il bidone

Il bidone

Between the international triumphs of La strada and Nights of Cabiria, Federico Fellini made this fascinatingly unique film, which has been long overlooked. Largely eschewing the poetic flourishes of the more famous works that bookend it, Il bidone is a dark neorealist crime drama starring a commanding Broderick Crawford as one of the most complex characters in the director’s canon: an aging con man who, having made a career preying on the desperation of poor peasants, suddenly finds that his crooked ways have begun to catch up with him. Masterfully entwining the story’s human grit with elements of humor and pathos, Fellini crafts a searing portrait of a man reckoning with the consequences of his life’s choices that hits with the force of a profound moral tragedy.

Film Info

Available In

Collector's Set

Essential Fellini

Essential Fellini

Blu-Ray Box Set

15 Discs

$199.96

Il bidone
Cast
Broderick Crawford
Augusto
Giulietta Masina
Iris Picasso
Richard Basehart
Carlo Picasso
Franco Fabrizi
Roberto
Sue Ellen
Anna
Irene Cefaro
Marisa
Alberto De
Rinaldo
Lorella De
Patrizia
Giacomo Gabrielli
Baron Vargas
Riccardo Garrone
Riccardo
Credits
Director
Federico Fellini
Screenplay
Federico Fellini
Screenplay
Ennio Flaiano
Screenplay
Tullio Pinelli
Cinematography
Otello Martelli
Editing
Mario Serandrei
Editing
Giuseppe Vari
Music
Nino Rota
Production design
Dario Cecchi
Producer
Silvio Clementelli
Producer
Charles Delac
Producer
Mario Derecchi
Producer
Goffredo Lombardo

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Federico Fellini

Writer, Director

Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini

One of Italy’s great modern directors, Federico Fellini was a larger-than-life maestro who created an inimitable cinematic style combining surreal carnival with incisive social critique. While his most popular—and accessible—film, the darkly nostalgic childhood memoir Amarcord, is a great entryway into his oeuvre, , a collage of memories, dreams, and fantasies about a director’s artistic crisis, is perhaps his masterpiece. In his early career, Fellini was both a screenwriter for neorealist pioneer Roberto Rossellini and a newspaper caricaturist in postwar Rome, competing influences he would bring together with startling results. After such early works as I vitelloni, Fellini broke away from neorealism’s political strictures with the beloved La strada, and from there boldly explored his obsessions with the circus, societal decadence, spiritual redemption, and, most controversially, women, in such films as Nights of Cabiria, Juliet of the Spirits, and And the Ship Sails On.