Lütfi Ö. Akad

Law of the Border

Law of the Border

Set along the Turkish-Syrian frontier, this terse, elemental tale of smugglers contending with a changing social landscape brought together two giants of Turkish cinema. Director Lütfi Ö. Akad had already made some of his country’s most notable films when he was approached by Yılmaz Güney—a rising action star who would become Turkey’s most important and controversial filmmaker—to collaborate on this neo-western about a quiet man who finds himself pitted against his fellow outlaws. Combining documentary authenticity with a tough, lean poetry, Law of the Border transformed the nation’s cinema forever—even though it was virtually impossible to see for many years.


Law of the Border was restored in 2013 by the Cineteca di Bologna/L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory, in association with The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project, Dadaş Films, and the Turkish Ministry of Culture. Restoration funded by Doha Film Institute.

Film Info

  • Lütfi Ö. Akad
  • Turkey
  • 1966
  • 76 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.37:1
  • Turkish
  • Spine #878

Available In

Collector's Set

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 2

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 2

Blu-Ray/DVD Combo Box Set

9 Discs

$99.96

Law of the Border
Cast
Yılmaz Güney
Hıdır
Pervin Par
Ayşe, the teacher
Erol Taş
Ali Cello
Tuncer Necmioglu
Aziz
Muharrem Gürses
Duran Ağa
Aydemir Akbaş
Abuzer
Sirri Elitaş
Ismail
Tuncel Kurtiz
Bekir
Atilla Ergün
Lieutenant Zeki
Osman Alyanak
Hasan Derviş Aga
Hikmet Olgun
Yusuf
Credits
Director
Lütfi Ö. Akad
Screenplay by
Lütfi Ö. Akad
From a story by
Yılmaz Güney
Cinematography
Ali Uğur
Assistant camera
İzzet Akay
Editor
Ali Ün
Music
Nida Tüfekçi
Sound engineer
Marko Boduris
Assistant director
Çetin İnanç
Production secretary
Abdullah Ataç

From The Current

Law of the Border: Breaking Boundaries and Building Bridges
Law of the Border: Breaking Boundaries and Building Bridges

By turns gritty and lyrical, this portrait of the Syria-Turkey border brings together two pioneers of Turkish cinema.

By Bilge Ebiri