• Japan
  • 1956
  • 110 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Japanese
  •  

Perhaps Masaki Kobayashi’s most sordid film, Black River examines the rampant corruption on and around U.S. military bases in Japan following World War II. Kobayashi spirals out from the story of a love triangle that develops between a good-natured student, his innocent girlfriend, and a coldhearted petty criminal (Tatsuya Nakadai, in his first major role) to reveal a nation slowly succumbing to lawlessness and violence.

Credits

DirectorMasaki Kobayashi
Produced byRyotaro Kuwata
Developed byNinjin Club
Original storyTakeo Tomishima
ScreenplayZenzo Matsuyama
CinematographyYuharu Atsuta
Production designShukei Hirataka
EditorYoshiyasu Hamamura
MusicChuji Kinoshita

Film Essays

Thickwalledroom_current_thumbnail

Eclipse Series 38: Kobayashi Against the System

By Michael Koresky April 17, 2013

Four of the great Japanese director’s lesser-known, early films show the coming into being of a political artist. Read more »

From the Eclipse Shelf


Film Essays

Thickwalledroom_current_thumbnail

Eclipse Series 38: Kobayashi Against the System

By Michael Koresky April 17, 2013

Four of the great Japanese director’s lesser-known, early films show the coming into being of a political artist. Read more »

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