Ingmar Bergman

The Devil’s Eye

The Devil’s Eye

The sophisticated fantasy The Devil’s Eye—the last Ingmar Bergman film to be shot by the great Gunnar Fischer—is an engaging satire of petit bourgeois morals. The devil (Stig Järrel) suffers from an inflamed eye, which he informs Don Juan (Jarl Kulle) can be cured only if a young woman’s chastity is breached. So the legendary lover ascends from hell and sets about seducing an innocent pastor’s daughter, Britt-Marie (Bibi Andersson). Bergman’s dialogue bubbles with an irony reminiscent of his beloved Molière, and the music of Domenico Scarlatti (performed by Bergman’s fourth wife, Käbi Laretei) underscores the joy that infuses much of the film.

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Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

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The Devil’s Eye
Cast
Jarl Kulle
Don Juan
Bibi Andersson
Britt-Marie
Stig Järrel
Satan
Nils Poppe
The vicar
Gertrud Fridh
Renata
Sture Lagerwall
Pablo
Georg Funkquist
Count Armand de Rochefoucauld
Gunnar Sjöberg
Marquis Giuseppe Maria de Macopanza
Torsten Winge
The old man
Axel Düberg
Jonas
Allan Edwall
The ear demon
Gunnar Björnstrand
The actor
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Producer
Allan Ekelund
Cinematographer
Gunnar Fischer
Music
Erik Nordgren
Editor
Oscar Rosander
Production design
P. A. Lundgren
Costume design
Mago
Makeup
Börje Lundh
Production manager
Lars-Owe Carlberg
Sound
Staffan Dalin
Sound
Stig Flodin

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Ingmar Bergman

Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.