Ingmar Bergman

Waiting Women

Waiting Women

While at a summerhouse, awaiting their husbands’ return, a group of sisters-in-law recount stories from their respective marriages. Rakel (Anita Björk) tells of receiving a visit from a former lover (Jarl Kulle); Marta (Maj-Britt Nilsson) of agreeing to marry a painter (Birger Malmsten) only after having his child; and Karin (Eva Dahlbeck) of being stuck with her husband (Gunnar Björnstrand) in an elevator, where they talk intimately for the first time in years. Making dexterous use of flashbacks, the engaging Waiting Women is a veritable seedbed of Bergman themes, ranging from aspiring young love to the fear of loneliness, with the finale a masterpiece of chamber comedy.

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Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

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Waiting Women
Cast
Anita Björk
Rakel
Eva Dahlbeck
Karin
Maj-Britt Nilsson
Marta
Birger Malmsten
Martin Lobelius
Gunnar Björnstrand
Fredrik Lobelius
Karl-Arne Holmsten
Eugen Lobelius
Jarl Kulle
Kaj
Aino Taube
Annette
Håkan Westergren
Paul Lobelius
Gerd
Maj
Björn Bjelfvenstam
Henrik Lobelius
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Based on a story by
Gun Grut
Producer
Allan
Music
Erik Nordgren
Cinematographer
Gunnar Fischer
Editor
Oscar Rosander
Production design
Nils Svenwall
Costume design
Barbro Sörman
Sound
Sven Hansen

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Ingmar Bergman

Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.