Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Beware of a Holy Whore

Beware of a Holy Whore

In Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s brazen depiction of the alternating currents of lethargy and mayhem inherent in moviemaking, a film crew—played by, and not so loosely based on, his own frequent collaborators—deals with an aloof star (Eddie Constantine), an abusive director (Lou Castel), and a financially troubled production. Inspired by the hellish process of making Whity earlier the same year, this is a vicious look at behind-the-scenes dysfunction.

Film Info

Available In

Collector's Set

Eclipse Series 39: Early Fassbinder

Early Fassbinder

DVD Box Set

5 Discs

$55.96

Beware of a Holy Whore
Cast
Lou Castel
Jeff
Eddie Constantine
Himself
Marquard Bohm
Ricky
Hanna Schygulla
Hanna
Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Sascha
Margarethe von Trotta
Babs
Hannes Fuchs
David
Marcella Michelangeli
Margret
Karl Scheydt
Manfred
Ulli Lommel
Korbinian
Kurt Raab
Fred
Monika Teuber
Billie
Katrin Schaake
Script girl
Magdalena Montezuma
Irm
Credits
Director
Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Screenplay
Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Cinematography
Michael Ballhaus
Art direction
Kurt Raab
Editor
Rainer Werner Fassbinder (as Franz Walsch)
Editor
Thea Eymèsz
Music
Peer Raben

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Aug 25, 2017
Eclipse Series 39: Early Fassbinder
Eclipse Series 39: Early Fassbinder

From the beginning, it was clear that Rainer Werner Fassbinder was destined to shake up German cinema.

By Michael Koresky

On Film / Essays — Aug 26, 2013

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Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Writer, Actor, Director

Rainer Werner Fassbinder made an astonishing forty-four movies—theatrical features, television movies and miniseries, and shorts among them—in a career that spanned a mere sixteen years, ending with his death at thirty-seven in 1982. He is perhaps remembered best for his intense and exquisitely shabby social melodramas (Ali: Fear Eats the Soul)—heavily influenced by Hollywood films, especially the female-driven tearjerkers of Douglas Sirk, and featuring misfit characters that often reflected his own fluid sexuality and self-destructive tendencies. But his body of work runs the gamut from epic period pieces (Berlin Alexanderplatz, the BRD Trilogy) to dystopic science fiction (World on a Wire) as well. One particular fascination of Fassbinder’s was the way the ghosts of the past, specifically those of World War II, haunted contemporary German life—an interest that wedded him to many of the other artists of the New German Cinema movement, which began in the late 1960s.