Wes Anderson

The Darjeeling Limited

The Darjeeling Limited

In director Wes Anderson's The Darjeeling Limited, three estranged American brothers reunite for a meticulously planned, soul-searching train voyage across India one year after the death of their father. Armed with eleven suitcases, a laminated itinerary, a can of pepper spray, a supply of over-the-counter painkillers, and a host of family conflicts ready to erupt, Francis, Peter, and Jack eventually find themselves stranded alone in the middle of the desert—at which point an unexpected new chapter in their journey begins. Featuring a sensational cast, including Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody, Jason Schwartzman, and Anjelica Huston, The Darjeeling Limited is a dazzling and hilarious film that takes Anderson’s work to deeper places than ever before.

Film Info

  • Wes Anderson
  • United States
  • 2007
  • 91 minutes
  • Color
  • 2.40:1
  • English
  • Spine #540

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New high-definition digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Wes Anderson, with DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray edition
  • Hotel Chevalier (part one of The Darjeeling Limited)
  • Audio commentary featuring Anderson and cowriters Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola
  • Behind-the-scenes documentary by Barry Braverman
  • Discussion between Anderson and filmmaker James Ivory on the music used in the film
  • Anderson’s American Express commercial
  • On-set footage shot by Coppola and actor Waris Ahluwalia
  • Video essay by critic Matt Zoller Seitz
  • Audition footage
  • Deleted and alternate scenes
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Stills galleries from James Hamilton, Laura Wilson, and Sylvia Plachy
  • PLUS: An insert featuring a new essay by critic Richard Brody and original illustrations by Eric Chase Anderson

New cover by Eric Chase Anderson

Purchase Options

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New high-definition digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Wes Anderson, with DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray edition
  • Hotel Chevalier (part one of The Darjeeling Limited)
  • Audio commentary featuring Anderson and cowriters Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola
  • Behind-the-scenes documentary by Barry Braverman
  • Discussion between Anderson and filmmaker James Ivory on the music used in the film
  • Anderson’s American Express commercial
  • On-set footage shot by Coppola and actor Waris Ahluwalia
  • Video essay by critic Matt Zoller Seitz
  • Audition footage
  • Deleted and alternate scenes
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Stills galleries from James Hamilton, Laura Wilson, and Sylvia Plachy
  • PLUS: An insert featuring a new essay by critic Richard Brody and original illustrations by Eric Chase Anderson

New cover by Eric Chase Anderson

The Darjeeling Limited
Cast
Owen Wilson
Francis
Adrien Brody
Peter
Jason Schwartzman
Jack
Amara Karan
Rita
Wally Wolodarsky
Brendan
Waris Ahluwalia
The chief steward
Irrfan Khan
The father
Barbet Schroeder
The mechanic
Camilla Rutherford
Alice
Bill Murray
The businessman
Anjelica Huston
Patricia
Credits
Director
Wes Anderson
Written by
Wes Anderson
Written by
Roman Coppola
Written by
Jason Schwartzman
Produced by
Wes Anderson
Produced by
Scott Rudin
Produced by
Roman Coppola
Produced by
Lydia Dean Pilcher
Executive producer
Steven Rales
Director of photography
Robert Yeoman
Production designer
Mark Friedberg
Editor
Andrew Weisblum
Costume designer
Milena Canonero
François Voltaire suitcases and costumes by
Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton
Suitcase wildlife drawings by
Eric Anderson
Co-producers
Alice Bamford
Co-producers
Jeremy Dawson
Co-producers
Anadil Hossain
Music supervisor
Randall Poster

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Explore

Wes Anderson

Director, Writer

Houston native Wes Anderson’s idiosyncratic directorial style—marked by eccentric, colorful compositions and a fastidious attention to detail—seemed completely anomalous in the U.S. independent film landscape at the outset of his career. But it’s become such an influence on other homegrown auteurs that it’s beginning to look as archetypally American as apple pie. Anderson debuted with Bottle Rocket, a thirteen-minute video shown at Sundance. On the strength of that short, producers James L. Brooks and Polly Platt brought Anderson and his cowriter and star Owen Wilson to Hollywood, where the pair embarked on the project of turning it into a feature. The result, a crisply shot comedy about dead-end criminals in Texas, announced Anderson as a major talent; his next film, Rushmore, a wildly acclaimed, widescreen coming-of-age tale that introduced actor Jason Schwartzman and gave Bill Murray a critical comeback, cemented that reputation. These films, like the ones he’s made in the years since—from the Oscar-nominated The Royal Tenenbaums to The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou to The Darjeeling Limited and the animated Fantastic Mr. Fox—are vivid, wry studies of families and other groups, infused with liberal doses of both hilarity and melancholy.


Read Anderson’s Top 10.