James Ivory

Roseland

Roseland

Three interlocking stories set in the legendary New York City dance palace Roseland make up this charming film, the third shot by Merchant Ivory Productions in America. In the first, “The Waltz,” Teresa Wright is a widow who comes to Roseland in order to sustain the memory of her late husband, and meets Stan (Lou Jacobi), a man who offers her an opportunity for happiness in the present. In “The Hustle,” Christopher Walken stars as a gigolo with three women in his life, all of whom depend on him for different degrees of romance and companionship. In the final segment, “The Peabody,” an older Viennese woman (Lilia Skala) sets out to win a dance competition despite warnings that it could imperil her health. Ruth Prawer Jhabvala’s understated screenplay received many accolades, and delivers an uncharacteristic bit of sentiment not present in other Merchant Ivory efforts.

Film Info

  • James Ivory
  • United Kingdom
  • 1977
  • 104 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.77:1
  • English

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing

Roseland
Cast
Teresa Wright
May
Christopher Walken
Russell
Geraldine Chaplin
Marilyn
Lilia Skala
Rosa
Lou Jacobi
Stan
Helen Gallagher
Cleo
Joan Copeland
Pauline
David Thomas
Arthur
Credits
Director
James Ivory
Producer
Ismail Merchant
Screenplay
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Executive producers
Michael T. Murphy
Executive producers
Ottomar Rudolf
Associate producers
Dennis J. Murphy
Associate producers
Macy Wall
Music arranged and directed by
Michael Gibson
Cinematography
Ernest Vincze
Editing
Humphrey Dixon
Editing
Richard Schmiechen
Costumes
Diane Finn Chapman

Explore

Ismail Merchant and James Ivory

Producer, Director

For five decades, the name Merchant Ivory has been an imprimatur signaling a certain type of quality cinema: literate, sumptuous, classical. But the more than fifty films made by the production team named for Ismail Merchant and James Ivory are distinguished by more than just their glossiness: multivalent, morally complex, and inquisitive, these works, shot all over the world (from Delhi to Paris to New England), are stories of class and of social change, of cultures divided and clashing. Merchant and Ivory (born in Bombay and Berkeley, respectively) met in 1961 and became partners in life and in work shortly thereafter; their company was founded with the idea of making English-language features (directed by Ivory, produced by Merchant) in India for the international market. These first films include The Householder (1963), based on the book by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who wrote the adaptation herself and instantly became an integral part of the company, and Shakespeare Wallah (1965). Soon, Merchant Ivory was shooting films in England, the United States, and elsewhere. Over the years, they have adapted novels by such writers as Henry James, E. M. Forster, and Kazuo Ishiguro into sophisticated works in their own right—their multiple-Oscar-winning Howards End (1992) is often considered their artistic pinnacle. Merchant died in 2005, but Ivory has kept the company going; The City of Your Final Destination, released in 2010, was the first “posthumous” Merchant Ivory film.