Jean-Luc Godard

2 or 3 Things I Know About Her

2 or 3 Things I Know About Her

In 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her (2 ou 3 choses que je sais d’elle), Jean-Luc Godard beckons us ever closer, whispering in our ears as narrator. About what? Money, sex, fashion, the city, love, language, war: in a word, everything. Among the legendary French filmmaker’s finest achievements, the film takes as its ostensible subject the daily life of Juliette Janson (Marina Vlady), a housewife from the Paris suburbs who prostitutes herself for extra money. Yet this is only a template for Godard to spin off into provocative philosophical tangents and gorgeous images. 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her is perhaps Godard’s most revelatory look at consumer culture, shot in ravishing widescreen color by Raoul Coutard.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary featuring film scholar Adrian Martin
  • Archival television interviews: the first featuring actress Marina Vlady on the set of the film, the second with Jean-Luc Godard debating the subject of prostitution
  • New video interview with theater director Antoine Bourseiller, a friend of Godard's in the sixties
  • A visual essay cataloguing the multiple references in the film
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by film critic Amy Taubin and the letter that sparked the idea for the film

New cover by Jason Hardy

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary featuring film scholar Adrian Martin
  • Archival television interviews: the first featuring actress Marina Vlady on the set of the film, the second with Jean-Luc Godard debating the subject of prostitution
  • New video interview with theater director Antoine Bourseiller, a friend of Godard's in the sixties
  • A visual essay cataloguing the multiple references in the film
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by film critic Amy Taubin and the letter that sparked the idea for the film

New cover by Jason Hardy

2 or 3 Things I Know About Her
Cast
Marina Vlady
Juliette Janson
Anny Duperey
Marianne
Joseph Gerhard
Monsieur Gérard
Roger Montsoret
Robert Janson
Raoul Lévy
John Bogus (the American journalist)
Jean Narboni
Roger
Christophe Bourseiller
Christophe Janson
Credits
Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Screenplay
Jean-Luc Godard
Based on an article by
Catherine Vimenet
Cinematography
Raoul Coutard
Sound
René Levert
Editing
Françoise Collin
Costumes
Gitt Magrini
Producer
Anatole Dauman
Producer
Raoul Lévy

From The Current

Godard in Fragments
Godard in Fragments

In the 1960s, pioneering French New Wave filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard introduced the world to a new cinematic lexicon, generated from his innovative, auteurist style. Between 1960 and 1967 alone, he made fifteen features (beginning with his groundbreaki…

By Kogonada

/
Heiress at the Revolution

Hidden Figures

Heiress at the Revolution

In the aftermath of the political turmoil that swept through France in 1968, Sylvina Boissonnas used her wealth to sponsor some of the most radical films of the era, including works by Philippe Garrel and Jackie Raynal.

By Sally Shafto

/
2 or 3 Things I Know About Her:
The Whole and Its Parts

The greatest film by the greatest post-1950s filmmaker, Jean-Luc Godard’s 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her presents the critic, humbled by the beauty of its surfaces, the density of its ideas, and the uncanny coherence of its fragmented structure, wi…

By Amy Taubin


Explore

Jean-Luc Godard

Director

A pioneer of the French new wave, Jean-Luc Godard has had an incalculable effect on modern cinema that refuses to wane. Before directing, Godard was an ethnology student and a critic for Cahiers du cinéma, and his approach to filmmaking reflects his interest in how cinematic form intertwines with social reality. His groundbreaking debut feature, Breathless—his first and last mainstream success—is, of course, essential Godard: its strategy of merging high (Mozart) and low (American crime thrillers) culture has been mimicked by generations of filmmakers. As the sixties progressed, Godard’s output became increasingly radical, both aesthetically (A Woman Is a Woman, Contempt, Band of Outsiders) and politically (Masculin féminin, Pierrot le fou), until by 1968 he had forsworn commercial cinema altogether, forming a leftist filmmaking collective (the Dziga Vertov Group) and making such films as Tout va bien. Today Godard remains our greatest lyricist on historical trauma, religion, and the legacy of cinema.