Jean-Luc Godard

Pierrot le fou

Pierrot le fou

Dissatisfied in marriage and life, Ferdinand (Jean-Paul Belmondo) takes to the road with the babysitter, his ex-lover Marianne Renoir (Anna Karina), and leaves the bourgeoisie behind. Yet this is no normal road trip: genius auteur Jean-Luc Godard's tenth feature in six years is a stylish mash-up of consumerist satire, politics, and comic-book aesthetics, as well as a violent, zigzag tale of, as Godard called them, "the last romantic couple." With blissful color imagery by cinematographer Raoul Coutard and Belmondo and Karina at their most animated, Pierrot le fou is one of the high points of the French New Wave, and was Godard's last frolic before he moved ever further into radical cinema.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, approved by cinematographer Raoul Coutard, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New video interview with actor Anna Karina
  • A "Pierrot" Primer, a new video program with audio commentary by filmmaker Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Godard, l'amour, la poésie, a fifty-minute French documentary about director Jean-Luc Godard and his work and marriage with Karina
  • Archival interview excerpts with Godard, Karina, and actor Jean-Paul Belmondo
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by critic Richard Brody, a 1969 review by Andrew Sarris, and a 1965 interview with Godard
    New cover by Steve Chow

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, approved by cinematographer Raoul Coutard, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New video interview with actor Anna Karina
  • A "Pierrot" Primer, a new video program with audio commentary by filmmaker Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Godard, l'amour, la poésie, a fifty-minute French documentary about director Jean-Luc Godard and his work and marriage with Karina
  • Archival interview excerpts with Godard, Karina, and actor Jean-Paul Belmondo
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by critic Richard Brody, a 1969 review by Andrew Sarris, and a 1965 interview with Godard
    New cover by Steve Chow
Pierrot le fou
Cast
Jean-Paul Belmondo
Ferdinand Griffon
Anna Karina
Marianne Renoir
Graziella Galvani
Mrs. Griffon
Dirk Sanders
Fred
Raymond Devos
Man on pier
Roger Dutoit
Gangster
Hans Meyer
Gangster
Credits
Screenplay
Jean-Luc Godard
Producer
Georges de Beauregard
Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Cinematography
Raoul Coutard

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Explore

Anna Karina

Actor

Anna Karina
Anna Karina

Few faces have fluttered the hearts of male cinephiles the way Anna Karina’s has. Karina has written and directed films, taken on prominent stage roles (including in plays directed by Jacques Rivette and Ingmar Bergman), had a successful singing career, and written four novels, but, of course, she is cited most often as Jean-Luc Godard’s New Wave muse and first wife. Godard decided he wanted to put her on-screen after seeing her in a sudsy Palmolive ad on television in the late 1950s. Though she turned down a small (nude) role in Breathless, she was soon cast in Godard’s next film, Le petit soldat (1961), at age twenty, and would go on to appear in six more of his films during the sixties, including the iconic Vivre sa vie and Band of Outsiders (she and Godard would also cameo together in Agnès Varda’s Cléo from 5 to 7). Though their cinematic collaboration seemed harmonious, behind the scenes, their relationship was tumultuous and bitter, made all the more difficult by the fact that it was under constant public scrutiny. Their three-year marriage ended in 1964, though they continued to work together until 1966. Karina stayed with film acting in the coming decades, working with such directors as Rivette, Luchino Visconti, George Cukor, Tony Richardson, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.