Author Spotlight

Audie Bock

Audie Bock is the author of Japanese Film Directors and Mikio Naruse: A Master of the Japanese Cinema, as well as the translator of Akira Kurosawa’s memoir, Something Like an Autobiography. She has taught Japanese cinema at colleges and universities around the United States and at the film school in Kawasaki, Japan, founded by Shohei Imamura. She currently lives in Alameda County, California.

5 Results

The Makioka Sisters: Of Love and Money
The Makioka Sisters: Of Love and Money

Bringing Junichiro Tanizaki’s sprawling, elegiac histor­ical novel The Makioka Sisters (1948) to the screen would seem an undertaking tailor-made for Kon Ichikawa. The renowned writer’s work was familiar territory for the veteran director, who…

By Audie Bock

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Pigs and Battleships: Feeding Frenzy

The title alone screams incongruity. Shohei Imamura’s 1961 black-and-white caper movie Pigs and Battleships bursts with the confusion and exuberance of a cross-cultural encounter. In its lively portrayal of enthusiastic Japanese locals welcoming th…

By Audie Bock


Twenty-Four Eyes: Growing Pains

One of the most awarded films in Japanese history, Twenty-Four Eyes was already a nostalgia piece when Keisuke Kinoshita directed it in 1954. For a Japanese audience just three years out of the Allied occupation following the heartrending devastation…

By Audie Bock

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Woman in the Dunes: Shifting Sands

Of the varied media the artist Hiroshi Teshigahara mastered, filmmaking is the one he let go. Upon the death of his headmaster father, in 1979, he assumed the full responsibility of leadership of the Sogetsu flower arrangement school, in which his si

By Audie Bock

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The Burmese Harp

In beautifully composed black-and-white, lilting easily from sweeping landscape to emotional close-up, and tempered by a gentle and nostalgic choral score, director Kon Ichikawa's The Burmese Harp probes deeply into the moral chaos of war. Following …

By Audie Bock

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