Author Spotlight

Bruce Eder

Bruce Eder is a longtime journalist, film writer, and audio/video producer whose work has appeared in the Village Voice, Newsday, Current Biography, Interview, and Oxford American. He is a frequent contributor to the Criterion Collection and has recorded audio commentaries for more than two dozen movies.

26 Results

Charade: The Spy in Givenchy
Eclipse Series 20: George Bernard Shaw on Film
The Atomic Submarine: Saving the World on a Shoestring Budget

Spencer Gordon Bennet’s The Atomic Submarine has always been a guilty pleasure of mine. It is easy enough to dismiss the film as kiddie matinee fare but, really, what science fiction–adventure movie from the 1950s wasn’t intended, at some level

By Bruce Eder

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Richard III

Laurence Olivier’s Richard III was the last and best of the trilogy of Shakespeare films directed by and starring the late actor and filmmaker. Shot in sixteen weeks during late 1954 and early 1955, Richard III was the final, crowning glory of the

By Bruce Eder

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Hopscotch

Ronald Neame’s Hopscotch has the distinction of being the only “feel-good” realistic spy film ever made. As the movie walks a fine line between serious drama and satirical comedy, and between topicality and escapism, it beguiles the viewer with

By Bruce Eder

Alec Guinness and The Horse’s Mouth

In addition to being his funniest film, The Horse’s Mouth is the most personal, and touching, of all Alec Guinness’ movies. Apart from starring as the brilliant but bedraggled artist Gulley Jimson, Guinness also adapted the Oscar-nominated screen

By Bruce Eder

Big Deal on Madonna Street

Mario Monicelli’s Big Deal on Madonna Street is that genuine rarity in popular culture: a satire that not only helped kill off one movie genre, but started a whole new subgenre in the process. The film, released in Italy in 1958 as I Soliti ignoti,

By Bruce Eder

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Henry V
Henry V

Laurence Olivier’s Henry V today seems like nothing less than a miracle in answer to the Chorus’s call for “a muse of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention.” It’s a dazzling adaptation of a Shakespeare play, made (in Tech…

By Bruce Eder

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Time Bandits
Time Bandits

Terry Gilliam’s Time Bandits was the most critically well-received children’s film in nearly two decades—and also the most challenging and rewarding fantasy-adventure movie since Alexander Korda’s The Thief of Bagdad, released forty-one years…

By Bruce Eder

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Samurai II

By Bruce Eder

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Samurai III

By Bruce Eder

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Samurai I

By Bruce Eder

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The Sword of Doom

If Akira Kurosawa is the John Ford of Japanese samurai dramas, then The Sword of Doom director Kihachi Okamoto is the samurai film’s Sam Fuller. A specialist in action films, with a particulat accent on violence and raw characterizations, Okomoto

By Bruce Eder

In Which We Serve

In Which We Serve began one of the greatest director/author collaborations in cinema, that of filmmaker David Lean (1908-1991) and theatrical legend Noel Coward (1899-1973). Ironically at first, neither Coward’s work on the film, nor his collabo…

By Bruce Eder

The Prince of Tides

The Prince of Tides is the high-water mark in a long and distinguished career in cinema. From the phenomenally successful 1968 musical Funny Girl through her meticulous 1983 rendering of Yentl, Barbra Streisand had earned her place among the most res

By Bruce Eder

Cat People

Val Lewton’s Cat People is a classic example of a cinematic diamond-in-the-rough.Recognized for decades as a definitive chiller, it was conceived as a title, with no story or notion in mind, and as a way of generating cash for RKO. Made in the mids…

By Bruce Eder

Two English Girls

The importance of Two English Girls lies in its sheer vitality. The film is an extraordinary cinematic conjuring trick in which Truffaut draws the viewer both physically and visually into his own personal pleasures. He does this on a multitude of lev

By Bruce Eder

The Emperor Jones

The Emperor Jones was the film that established Paul Robeson (1898-1976) as a screen star. Capturing for posterity the portrayal that brought Robeson fame, Emperor was a turning point—the culmination of his early career and a groundbreaking showcas…

By Bruce Eder

Evergreen

But for the recalcitrance of RKO, Evergreen could have been the finest of Fred Astaire’s movies. Instead, it was never an Astaire film, but “merely” the best musical ever made in England, and the finest film of the legendary Jessie Matthews (19…

By Bruce Eder

Jason and the Argonauts

The evolution of Jason and the Argonauts began in the late 1950s, after the initial success of 20 Million Miles to Earth. Harryhausen and his producer, Charles Schneer, decided to get away from doing “monster-on-the-loose” stories and try somethi

By Bruce Eder

The Tales of Hoffmann

Of the 18 movies made by the filmmaking team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, none was as personally and artistically fulfilling as The Tales of Hoffmann. This dazzling screen adaptation of the Offenbach opera—a visual, sonic, and sensual …

By Bruce Eder

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The Devil and Daniel Webster

Few films have had as exalted, or as tumultuous, a history as The Devil and Daniel Webster. Directed and produced by William Dieterle at RKO after his triumphant Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Devil and Daniel Webster is the finest of the ambitious pro…

By Bruce Eder

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Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge is about sex. No, actually, that’s not entirely right. Carnal Knowledge is really about sex without relationships, and sex without eroticism—these are the subjects of Jules Feiffer’s screenplay, and all that the four main chara…

By Bruce Eder

Help!

Richard Lester’s Help! was the first of a new kind of rock-and-roll movie which altered the shape, face, and form of rock music. Before Help!, most of the rock-and-roll genre movies were simple, self contained films conceived in the narrowest possi

By Bruce Eder