Author Spotlight

Gary Indiana

Gary Indiana is the author of many novels and works of nonfiction, including the BFI monograph Salo?, or The 120 Days of Sodom by Pasolini. His most recent book is To Whom It May Concern, a collaboration with the artist Louise Bourgeois.

10 Results

Pickpocket:Robert Bresson: Hidden in Plain Sight

Pickpocket:
Robert Bresson: Hidden in Plain Sight

I have an unusually easy way of remembering when I first became fascinated by Robert Bresson’s films. Pickpocket (1959) was the first one I saw, at the old Orson Welles theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in my late teens; it was also the first mo…

By Gary Indiana

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Naked Lunch: Burroughs

Naked Lunch: Burroughs

This essay by novelist, playwright, and culture critic Gary Indiana originally appeared in the 1992 book Everything Is Permitted: The Making of “Naked Lunch.” Burroughs’s work tends to affect people like a Rorschach test. It separates cultural …

By Gary Indiana

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The Last Weekend
The Last Weekend

Jean Luc Godard’s exuberant, multipronged attack on the bourgeoisie is both theater of the absurd and political horror.

By Gary Indiana

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Salò: The Written Movie

The title card that appears in the opening credits of Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, Pasolini’s “Recommended Bibliography,” seems to signal to the viewer that the filmmaker’s intentions can’t be fully understood without a familiarity with…

By Gary Indiana


Léon Morin, Priest: Life During Wartime
Léon Morin, Priest: Life During Wartime

To a secular eye, Jean-Pierre Melville’s sixth feature film, Léon Morin, Priest (1961), is about almost anything except religion: the deleterious effects of sexual repression, the moral bleariness of wartime and life under occupation, the harsh in…

By Gary Indiana

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Videodrome: The Slithery Sense of Unreality
Videodrome: The Slithery Sense of Unreality

“Eroticism,” Luis Buñuel told an interviewer, “is a diabolic pleasure that is related to death and rotting flesh.” No filmmaker conveys this idea with more ingenuity and macabre gusto than David Cronenberg, whose movies (hilariously, terr…

By Gary Indiana

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Les enfants terribles:
Hazards of a Snowball Fight

Adapted from the famed samizdat novel of the French Resistance, Jean-Pierre Melville’s first feature, Le silence de la mer (1949), despite critical and commercial success, gained its director little glory: overshadowed by the book and the celebrity…

By Gary Indiana


Barbet and Koko: An Equivocal Love Affair

Barbet Schroeder is a director who prefers the appellation “explorer” to that of “auteur,” and again and again his films demonstrate both his intense curiosity about the unexplored and his willingness to allow material he discovers to speak f…

By Gary Indiana


Pasolini, Mamma Roma, and La Ricotta

Indefatigably productive, ingenious, exasperating, narcissistically didactic, slyly self-promoting, abject, generous, exploitative, devoted to the wretched of the earth with honest fervor and deluded romanticism: Pier Paolo Pasolini can easily exhaus…

By Gary Indiana


The Phantom of Liberty:
The Serpentine Movements of Chance

Of the various insects that like to make their home in our houses, certainly the most interesting, for her beautiful shape, her curious manners, and her wonderful nest, is a certain Wasp called the Pelopaeus. She is very little known, even to the peo

By Gary Indiana