Author Spotlight

David Ehrenstein

29 Results

La Cage aux Folles: Folles Family Values
La Cage aux Folles: Folles Family Values

As outré as it is, the most subversive thing about this classic farce is its take on what’s normal.

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Sep 9, 2013
Eating Raoul: Murder Most Delicious
Eating Raoul: Murder Most Delicious

Countercultural icons Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov makes square subversive in Bartel’s cult classic.

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Sep 26, 2012
The Last Temptation of Christ: Passion Project

The Last Temptation of Christ: Passion Project

In the becalmed atmosphere of today’s Hollywood, it’s hard to imagine the tumult that greeted The Last Temptation of Christ when it was released in 1988. Brilliantly directed by Martin Scorsese, this adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis’s imaginat…

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Mar 13, 2012
If....: School Days

If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too; If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about

By David Ehrenstein


Aug 31, 2011
The Red Shoes:
Dancing for Your Life

“Why do you want to dance?” “Why do you want to live?” A question followed by another question stands at the beating heart of The Red Shoes. It’s an entirely rhetorical exchange, but it underscores the power and the mystery of Michael Pow…

By David Ehrenstein


Jul 20, 2010
M. Hulot’s Holiday
M. Hulot’s Holiday

One of the most original—and hilarious—comedies ever made, M. Hulot’s Holiday has delighted and disarmed moviegoers the world over since its first appearance in 1953. There’s little in the way of plot or dialogue to this French-made farce abo…

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Jan 6, 2004
General Idi Amin Dada

Though he wasn’t widely known to most moviegoers until 1990’s Reversal of Fortune, serious film enthusiasts have followed the career of Barbet Schroeder for close to half a century. His work as a producer (of nearly all of Eric Rohmer’s witt…

By David Ehrenstein


May 14, 2002
Kwaidan
Kwaidan

One of the most meticulously crafted supernatural fantasy films ever made, Masaki Kobayashi’s Kwaidan (1964) is also one of the most unusual. While such classic black and white chillers as The Uninvited, The Innocents and The Haunting teasingly spe

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Oct 10, 2000
Pygmalion

“I wish to boast,” Bernard Shaw wrote, “that Pygmalion has been an extremely successful play, both on stage and screen, all over Europe and North America as well as at home. It is so intensely and deliberately didactic, and its subject is estee…

By David Ehrenstein


Sep 19, 2000
The Last Temptation of Christ: Passion Project

Film Essays

The Last Temptation of Christ: Passion Project

The controversy surrounding the release of Scorsese’s film obscured its radical and profound spirituality.

By David Ehrenstein


Apr 25, 2000
Seven Samurai

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Nov 23, 1999
Black Orpheus

By David Ehrenstein

On Film / Essays
Jun 8, 1999
Raging Bull

When two different critics polls cited Raging Bull as the greatest film of the 1980s, it was the final confirmation of what many film lovers had come to suspect for some time. As a decade marked mainly by the cheapest sort of slam-bang popcorn thrill…

By David Ehrenstein


Dec 3, 1990
King of Hearts

Some films have become famous simply because they’ve sold a lot of tickets. Others have major studio publicity machines behind them, the better to hog the spotlight. Still others earn their fame the hard way through genuine critical acclaim. But t…

By David Ehrenstein


Jun 25, 1990
Floating Weeds

Subtle, lyrical, and delicately bittersweet, Floating Weeds offers an excellent introduction to the cinema of Yasujiro Ozu—one of the greatest of all Japanese filmmakers, and until recently in the West, one of the least known. “The Japanese . . …

By David Ehrenstein


Aug 25, 1989
Paths of Glory

With Paths of Glory (1958), director Stanley Kubrick established himself not simply as the leading commercial filmmaker of his generation, but a world-class talent as well. Based on a novel by Humphrey Cobb, this tragic tale of World War I was immedi…

By David Ehrenstein


Jun 26, 1989
Darling

When Darling debuted in 1965, Bosley Crowther of the New York Times remarked that director John Schlesinger had “made a film that will set tongues to wagging and moralists wringing their hands.” There was plenty of tongue-wagging over this satiri…

By David Ehrenstein


Mar 16, 1989
Blowup

Newspapers and magazines were just beginning to detail the phenomenon known as “Swinging London” when Blowup burst upon the movie world in 1966. The look, the style, the clothes, the music, the mood and just about everything else connected with a…

By David Ehrenstein


Dec 6, 1988
North by Northwest

The wittiest, most sophisticated thriller ever made, North by Northwest is one of the crowning achievements in the careers of its director, Alfred Hitchcock, and its star, Cary Grant. Released in 1959 to both critical and public acclaim, this classic…

By David Ehrenstein


Nov 1, 1988
The Killing

One of the most ingenious and entertaining crime thrillers ever made, The Killing marks what its director Stanley Kubrick would like to think of as the real beginning of his career. The future director of 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, an…

By David Ehrenstein


Nov 1, 1988
Shoot the Piano Player

When Francois Truffaut’s first feature The 400 Blows made its debut in 1959, critics the world over hailed its low-key semidocumentary style in telling its tale of a troubled, melancholy youth. You can imagine then the confusion these same critics …

By David Ehrenstein


Sep 6, 1988
Vengeance Is Mine

Over the years the cinema has given us any number of tales of the criminal underworld, and explorations of the mindsets of murderers. Yet for all that’s come before there’s been nothing quite like Shohei Imamura’s Vengeance Is Mine. Based on o…

By David Ehrenstein


Jul 12, 1988
Forbidden Games

Over the years countless films have been made about war, its horrors and its devastations. Few, however, have been as moving and heartfelt as René Clément’s Forbidden Games. The Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film in 1952, this de…

By David Ehrenstein


Apr 12, 1988
The Producers

Back in 1968 when The Producers made its debut, writer-director Mel Brooks was better known within the entertainment industry than by the public at large. His writing for Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows and the Get Smart television series, plus his…

By David Ehrenstein


Apr 5, 1988