Xxx_film_coltismypassport_original

Hulu film festival!

by MainelyKirby

Created 07/22/12

Edit List

I gladly pay Hulu every month for their service because Criterion is so active there. In this growing list I am sharing the films I have seen, but I'm not going to rank them... read my reviews if you want to know which I liked best :)

Films on hulu not on this list: Hanzo the Razor films, I Married a Witch, Things to Come, I was a Teenage Zombie, The Cars That Ate Paris, Golden Eyes, A King in New York,

  • These Japanese noir films are a delight, and this one is my favorite so far. The showdown at the end is inventive and paradoxically claustrophobic, the lead character pinned down in the most open of spaces.

  • Jarmusch is a filmmaker who I loved without knowing it for years... It wasn't until I saw Down by Law that I put together the pieces; Coffee and Cigarettes, Night on Earth, Mystery Train.. all are films I enjoyed separately without paying attention to the director's name before.
    I look forward to discovering more of Jarmusch's films on Hulu-- Stranger than Paradise and Permanent Vacation are ones I haven't seen yet.

  • I saw this on Hulu and enjoyed it enough to buy the blu-ray. Best known for launching John Wayne to new heights as a film actor, what I like most are the interplay of all the typical western characters that appear in the genre... gamblers, drunkards, mousy bankers/salesmen/husbands, and of course hookers with hearts of gold.

    The final act of this film is a great example of how American westerns influenced Kurosawa's samauri masterpieces, it's impossible to watch without Yojimbo coming to mind.

  • Despite all his flaws, I would love to be Albert Finney living in pre-WW2 Mexico. Drinking yourself to death never looked so cool.

  • Welles seems to be wearing the same magician costume you see in A Safe Place, filmed 2 years earlier... I loved this documentary, and the playful Welles evokes the same rogue character we saw him play in The Third Man, though not as dark of course.

  • A fun heist film, an obvious influence for Oceans Eleven... Except of course the devil is in the details if you want to plan the prefect crime.

  • The technicolor of this is rich and the story engaging. I also like the remake of this with Heath Ledger; the original appeals on different levels though, I look forward to watching more Korda on Hulu.

  • This is an engaging character study of a boy's struggle to define himself while being shuffled from foster home to foster home. What really struck me was how well the story challenges the viewer to empathize with both child and the system that is trying to help make the best of a bad situation.

    Not recommended if you like to have pat satisfying resolution to the conflicts and character arcs in the plot... but if you're okay with that, this film will stick with you long after you watch it. Look for the short documentary on this film too, also available on Hulu.

  • This look back at the holocaust a mere 10 years after the horror still resonates today.

  • This was a fun comedy, and puts "the sanctity of marriage" a bit in perspective while we all debate gay marriage as a nation :)

  • The '42 version with narration is available on Hulu. I was particularly amazed with the special effects of this film, the work with minatures for the cabin scenes toward the end still hold up almost a century later.

    I plan to get the blu-ray release of this to learn more about this one, and I've heard the 1920's original is even better.

  • How did I not know that Twelve Monkeys was based on this short film?? Not sure if I will end up owning this or not, but this 28 minute short is a must-see for anyone who loves inventive time travel stories.

  • A great Japanese noir heist story, meticulously planned so that everything goes perfectly and as expected. Well, the great part is true at least :)

  • I loved this film, and hope it gets a blu-ray release soon (alongside Ikuru).

  • Watch this while you can! I've heard Tati's films are going to Studio Canal, and out of Criterion's hands (I'll update this if I learn otherwise).

    This is a great little slice of French 60's modernist suburbia, the story is lighthearted, and the settings provide opportunity for slapstick visual gags.

  • I watched all 3 films in this Eclipse set. I greatly enjoyed the original Leningrad Cowboys Go America, and thought the live concert Total Balalaika Show was oddly entertaining. The sequel film Leningrad Cowboys Meet Moses was a bit of a letdown, though.

  • Another Japanese Noir picture, a classic tale of antihero criminals trying to leave behind their shady past.

  • This was an entertaining piece of film— I have not seen the Matt Damon version of this story, and after seeing Clément's rendition I don't think I need to.

  • I watched this shortly after devouring Criterion's BBS boxed set, and I felt it was a great fit with those other films, despite having nothing in common with them. Brad Dourif is great in the lead role, as expected.

  • This was really engaging. Highly recommended both for the subject matter as well as the documentary style (very cinematic at times)

  • This struck me as similar in tone to Mon Oncle, and gives a look at postwar suburban Japan from the point of view of the children and housewives of an anonymous neighborhood.

  • A fascinating look at a facility caring for emotionally disturbed teens and children, you get a real feel for both the patients and the staff and their struggles.

  • A must-see for hulu subscribers— the photography is excellent, the action engaging, and the pacing pitch perfect. A nice morsel before another, longer film makes for a nice mini-film fest.

  • I really like Head featuring The Monkees, and the description of Three Resurrected Drunkards piqued my interest, but upon watching the film I found my mind wandering. If you are emotionally invested in Japanese social structure and issues of racism in other cultures, this movie will be up your alley.

  • A silly, low budget film— Mr. Freedom is a fun one to put on with friends over. Donald Pleasance makes an early appearance, and the cynical political satire is as contemporary as ever at its core.

  • I watched this specifically to decide if I should buy the blu-ray of this or not. I know film lovers are supposed to love Bergman, but the slow pace of this and The Seventh Seal get in the way of appreciating the director's skill. Your opinion may vary, of course!

  • I saw this on the heels of My Crasy Life and didn't think it was as successful. It covers different aspects of this story, but none are fleshed out to a satisfying degree.

1 comment

Or using your Criterion.com account.

You are logged in to your Criterion.com account as . Log out.