The Browning Version Film Still

The Browning Version

Anthony Asquith

 
The Browning Version (Criterion DVD)

DVD

1 Disc

SRP: $29.95

Criterion Store price:$23.96

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  • United Kingdom
  • 1951
  • 90 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  •  
  • Spine #294

Michael Redgrave gives the performance of his career in Anthony Asquith’s adaptation of Terence Rattigan’s unforgettable play. Redgrave portrays Andrew Crocker-Harris, an embittered, middle-aged schoolmaster who begins to feel that his life has been a failure. Diminished by poor health, a crumbling marriage, and the derision of his pupils, the once brilliant scholar is compelled to reexamine his life when a young student offers an unexpected gesture of kindness. A heartbreaking story of remorse and atonement, The Browning Version is a classic of British realism and the winner of best actor and best screenplay honors at the 1951 Cannes Film Festival.

Cast

Andrew Crocker-HarrisMichael Redgrave
Millicent Crocker-HarrisJean Kent
Frank HunterNigel Patrick
TaplowBrian Smith
GilbertRonald Howard
FrobisherWilfred Hyde White

Credits

DirectorAnthony Asquith
ScreenplayTerence Rattigan
CinematographyDesmond Dickinson
Art directionCarmen Dillon
EditingJohn D. Guthridge

Disc Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by film historian Bruce Eder
  • New video interview with Mike Figgis, director of the 1994 remake
  • Archival interview with Michael Redgrave from 1958
  • A new essay by film critic Geoffrey Macnab
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing

    New cover by Michael Boland

Film Essays

The Browning Version

By Geoffrey MacnabJune 27, 2005

Contemplating Anthony “Puffin” Asquith’s career, it is striking how self-effacing he . . . Read more »

Clippings

Asquith Back from Underground

November 04, 2009

<!--StartFragment--Anthony Asquith is remembered primarily as the director of Pygmalion, . . . Read more »


Film Essays

The Browning Version

By Geoffrey MacnabJune 27, 2005

Contemplating Anthony “Puffin” Asquith’s career, it is striking how self-effacing he . . . Read more »