Crazed Fruit Crazed Fruit

Crazed Fruit

Kô Nakahira

 
Crazed Fruit (Criterion DVD)

DVD

1 Disc

SRP: $29.95

Criterion Store price:$23.96

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  • Japan
  • 1956
  • 86 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Japanese
  •  
  • Spine #295

Two brothers compete for the amorous favors of a young woman during a seaside summer of gambling, boating, and drinking, in this seminal Sun Tribe (taiyozoku) film from director Kô Nakahira. Adapted from the controversial novel by Shintarô Ishihara, and critically savaged for its lurid portrayal of the postwar sexual revolution among Japan’s young and privileged, Crazed Fruit is an anarchic outcry against tradition and the older generation.

Credits

DirectorKô Nakahira
ProducerTakiko Mizunoe
Screenplay and original storyShintaro Ishihara
CinematographyShigeyoshi Mine
Art directorTakashi Matsuyama
MusicMasaru Sato and Toru Takemitsu

Disc Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by renowned Japanese-film scholar Donald Richie
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: A 16-page booklet featuring new essays by critic Chuck Stephens and film scholar Michael Raine

    New cover by Christine Ditrio

Film Essays

Heat Stroke: Crazed Fruit and Japanese Cinema’s Season in the Sun

By Chuck Stephens June 27, 2005

Then film critic and soon-to-be figurehead of the 1960s Japanese new wave Nagisa Oshima saw it as a portent of the future, famously observing that “in the sound of the girl’s skirt being ripped . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Crazed Fruit: Imagining a New Japan— The Taiyozoku Films

By Michael Raine June 27, 2005

Youth was a global problem problem in the mid-1950s, in literature, journalism, and film. The cultural old guard was in retreat from the likes of Françoise Sagan in France, J. D. Salinger in the . . . Read more »

Film Essays

Heat Stroke: Crazed Fruit and Japanese Cinema’s Season in the Sun

By Chuck Stephens June 27, 2005

Then film critic and soon-to-be figurehead of the 1960s Japanese new wave Nagisa Oshima saw it as a portent of the future, famously observing that “in the sound of the girl’s skirt being ripped . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Crazed Fruit: Imagining a New Japan— The Taiyozoku Films

By Michael Raine June 27, 2005

Youth was a global problem problem in the mid-1950s, in literature, journalism, and film. The cultural old guard was in retreat from the likes of Françoise Sagan in France, J. D. Salinger in the . . . Read more »