My Night at Maud’s My Night at Maud’s

My Night at Maud’s

Eric Rohmer

 
  • France
  • 1969
  • 111 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • French
  •  
  • Spine #345

In the brilliantly accomplished centerpiece of Rohmer’s “Moral Tales” series, Jean-Louis Trintignant plays Jean-Louis, one of the great conflicted figures of sixties cinema. A pious Catholic engineer in his early thirties, he lives by a strict moral code in order to rationalize his world, drowning himself in mathematics and the philosophy of Pascal. After spotting the delicate, blonde Françoise at Mass, he vows to make her his wife, although when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of the bold, brunette divorcée Maud, his rigid ethical standards are challenged. A breakout hit in the United States, My Night at Maud’s was one of the most influential and talked-about films of the decade.

Disc Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Eric Rohmer
  • On Pascal, (1965), directed by Rohmer for the educational TV series En profil dans le texte
  • A 1974 episode of the French television program Télécinéma, featuring interviews with star Jean-Louis Trintignant, film critic Jean Douchet, and producer Pierre Cottrell
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

Film Essays

My Night at Maud’s: Chances Are . . .

By Kent Jones August 14, 2006

“Some people think Rohmer is in league with the devil,” wrote cinematographer nestor almendros in his book of autobiographical reflections on the cinema, a man with a camera. He was describing . . . Read more »

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Film Essays

My Night at Maud’s: Chances Are . . .

By Kent Jones August 14, 2006

“Some people think Rohmer is in league with the devil,” wrote cinematographer nestor almendros in his book of autobiographical reflections on the cinema, a man with a camera. He was describing . . . Read more »