• Denmark
  • 1964
  • 119 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Danish
  •  
  • Spine #127

Carl Dreyer’s last film neatly crowns his career: a meditation on tragedy, individual will and the refusal to compromise. A woman leaves her unfulfilling marriage and embarks on a search for ideal love—but neither a passionate affair with a younger man nor the return of an old romance can provide the answer she seeks. Always the stylistic innovator, Dreyer employs long takes and theatrical staging to concentrate on Nina Pens Rode’s sublime portrayal of the proud and courageous Gertrud.

Cast

Gertrud Kanning Nina Pens Rode
Gustav KanningBendt Rothe
Gabriel LidmanEbbe Rode
Erland JanssonBaard Owe
Axel NygenAxel Strøbye

Disc Features

  • New digital transfer, supervised by director of photography Henning Bendtsen, and enhanced for 16×9 televisions
  • Deleted footage of interviews from Torben Skødt Jensen’s documentary Carl Th. Dreyer—My Metier, with actors Baard Owe and Axel Strøbye
  • Archival footage from the time of Gertrud’s production
  • Stills gallery
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition

Film Essays

Gertrud

By Phillip Lopate August 20, 2001

There is no other movie like Gertrud. It exists in its own bright, one-entry category, idiosyncratic, serenely stubborn, and sublime. When it opened in 1964, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s last film, one . . . Read more »

Clippings



Features

Gertrud and Light in August

By Jonathan Rosenbaum October 26, 2010

For several decades now, William Faulkner’s Light in August (1932) and Carl Dreyer’s Gertrud (1964) have been major touchstones for me—not only separately but also in some mysterious relation to . . . Read more »


REMEMBERING GERTRUD

July 10, 2009

The final, resolutely unfashionable film from grand old master Carl Theodor Dreyer, Gertrud was met with dismissal in 1964 and continues to be somewhat overlooked even today. But this week, . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Gertrud

By Phillip Lopate August 20, 2001

There is no other movie like Gertrud. It exists in its own bright, one-entry category, idiosyncratic, serenely stubborn, and sublime. When it opened in 1964, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s last film, one . . . Read more »