Hiroshima mon amour Film Still

Hiroshima mon amour

Alain Resnais

 
Hiroshima mon amour (Criterion DVD)

DVD

1 Disc

SRP: $39.95

Criterion Store price:$31.96

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  • France
  • 1959
  • 91 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • French
  •  
  • Spine #196

A cornerstone film of the French New Wave, Alain Resnais’ first feature is one of the most influential films of all time. A French actress (Emmanuelle Riva) and a Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) engage in a brief, intense affair in postwar Hiroshima, their consuming fascination impelling them to exorcise their own scarred memories of love and suffering. Utilizing an innovative flashback structure and an Academy Award-nominated® screenplay by novelist Marguerite Duras, Resnais delicately weaves past and present, personal pain and public anguish, in this moody masterwork.

Disc Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by film historian Peter Cowie
  • Cinepanorama interview with Alain Resnais (1961)
  • Audio interview with Alain Resnais (1980)
  • Emmanuelle Riva interviewed by François Chalais at Cannes (1959)
  • Excerpts from Duras’ annotations to the screenplay
  • Isolated music and effects track
  • A new essay on composer Giovanni Fusco by Russell Lack
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
  • A new essay on the film by Kent Jones

    New cover by Neil Kellerhouse

Film Essays

Hiroshima mon amour: Time Indefinite

By Kent Jones June 23, 2003

“I think that in a few years, in ten, twenty, or thirty years, we will know whether Hiroshima mon amour was the most important film since the war, the first modern film of sound cinema.” That’s . . . Read more »

Play Resnais600_video_still

Remembering Alain Resnais

By Alexandre Mabilon March 06, 2014

Watch video »


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Performances


Film Essays

Hiroshima mon amour: Time Indefinite

By Kent Jones June 23, 2003

“I think that in a few years, in ten, twenty, or thirty years, we will know whether Hiroshima mon amour was the most important film since the war, the first modern film of sound cinema.” That’s . . . Read more »