17 comments

  • By graham82
    May 02, 2012
    01:33 PM

    Can't wait!
    Reply
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  • By Sidney
    May 02, 2012
    06:39 PM

    1) Harold's many surreal suicides. 2) The imitable Ruth Gordon. 3) Cat Steven's masterpiece soundtrack.
    Reply
  • By afterthefact
    May 02, 2012
    11:09 PM

    pretty fantastic. But I can't hear Cat Stevens without thinking about him on British TV in the 80's, saying he'd kill Salman Rushdie as per Ayatollah Khomeini's Fatwa.
    Reply
  • By Todd J.
    May 03, 2012
    01:58 PM

    All of the Criterion blu-rays have been revelatory. Since their theatrical release, these films have languished due to the limitations in home video technology (and the willingness of the studios to deliver "the goods"). My deepest thanks to whomever considered "Harold and Maude" a deserving addition to Criterion's catalogue.
    Reply
  • By G. Haad, Esq.
    May 03, 2012
    08:41 PM

    * Samuel could we bury the hatchet already? What Yusuf stated was that as a devout muslim layperson, it wasn't his place to furnish an aggressive interviewer with his own unorthodox opinions or to publicly challenge respected leaders of his religion -- simply because of the celebrity deriving from his previous career -- a very reasonable position for a man of faith to take under the circumstances I dare say ...
    Reply
  • By Patrick S
    May 04, 2012
    10:32 AM

    Trouble/Oh trouble move from me
    Reply
  • By tj
    May 04, 2012
    01:01 PM

    YAY!!! 8 years of begging Criterion for a "Harold and Maude" release have finally paid off!!!
    Reply
  • By William Epperson
    May 08, 2012
    05:53 PM

    "Harold and Maude" presents the psychological portrait of a non-nutritive mother figure in Harold's Mom, a nutritive figure in Maude, and a life affirming decision by Harold at the end. It is also made delightful by the music of Cat Stevens. I've seen it many times, and will see it again.
    Reply
  • By ggfanjase
    May 18, 2012
    01:50 AM

    D'awwwwwww. I definitely need to buy this, it's been way too long since I've seen it.
    Reply
  • By Serge
    May 25, 2012
    11:45 AM

    1) I still remember when and where I saw it for the first time. 2) I think about the movie on a regular basis 3) The moment when Harold rolls down the car window while we hear "Trouble" and the tinkling notes on the piano emerge, like a sorrow about to vanish.
    Reply
  • By Morgan
    June 08, 2012
    08:05 PM

    I agree with your 1, 2, and 3. And I'd like to add 4 - his mother - a brilliantly hilarious performance by the inimitable Vivian Pickles!
    Reply
  • By charles
    July 26, 2012
    02:47 AM

    Did Wes Anderson put you up to this? I only ask because we know Criterion has a Wes Anderson boner, and each one of his films feels directly inspired by this film. I love this film dearly, and am putting it in my shopping cart now. Just pointing out something I've noticed. Own it, Wes.
    Reply
  • By Shaun
    July 26, 2012
    06:26 AM

    "a Wes Anderson boner" - classy Charles. Reeeal classy. : )
    Reply
  • By DavidDR
    July 26, 2012
    06:54 AM

    I hope Charles means that they have a boner for him, because if Criterion actually has a Wes Anderson boner -- then he surely must want it back. ;)
    Reply
  • By Moviefan777
    December 26, 2012
    11:06 PM

    1. Haorld 2. Maude 3. Harold + Maude Simple really.
    Reply
  • By ali m.
    April 11, 2013
    06:14 PM

    i had a strange feeling about maude (the widow) she had a very rough and not happy past but choosing happy life and give this too harold and then they become a real and happy couple that they deserve it ......
    Reply
  • By Vince C.
    July 27, 2014
    12:36 PM

    I agree with all three reasons, but come on! 1. Cat 2. Stevens' 3. music! (What would the movie be without it? What would The Graduate be without Simon and Garfunkel, or McCabe and Mrs. Miller without Leonard Cohen?)
    Reply

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