Akira Kurosawa

Madadayo

Madadayo

For his final film, Akira Kurosawa paid tribute to the immensely popular writer and educator Hyakken Uchida, here played by Tatsuo Matsumura. Madadayo is composed of distinct episodes based on Uchida's writings that illustrate the affection and loyalty felt between Uchida and his students. Poignant and elegant, this is an unforgettable farewell from one of the greatest artists the cinema has ever known.

Film Info

Available In

Collector's Set

AK 100: 25 Films by Akira Kurosawa

AK 100: 25 Films by Kurosawa

DVD Box Set

25 Discs

Ships Oct 12, 2018

$319.00

Out Of Print
Madadayo
Cast
Tatsuo Matsumura
Professor Hyakken Uchida
Kyoko Kagawa
Professor's wife
Hisashi Igawa
Takayama
George Tokoro
Amaki
Masayuki Yui
Kiriyama
Akira Terao
Sawamura
Credits
Director
Akira Kurosawa
Producer
Gohei Kogure
Producer
Hisao Kurosawa
Producer
Yasuyoshi Tokuma
Executive producers
Yuzo Irie
Executive producers
Yo Yamamoto
Screenplay
Akira Kurosawa
Based on the book by
Uchida Hyakken
Cinematography
Takao Saito
Cinematography
Masaharu Ueda
Production design
Yoshiro Muraki
Music
Shinichiro Ikebe

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Akira Kurosawa

Writer, Director

Arguably the most celebrated Japanese filmmaker of all time, Akira Kurosawa had a career that spanned from the Second World War to the early nineties and that stands as a monument of artistic, entertainment, and personal achievement. His best-known films remain his samurai epics Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, but his intimate dramas, such as Ikiru and High and Low, are just as searing. The first serious phase of Kurosawa’s career came during the postwar era, with Drunken Angel and Stray Dog, gritty dramas about people on the margins of society that featured the first notable appearances by Toshiro Mifune, the director’s longtime leading man. Kurosawa would subsequently gain international fame with Rashomon, a breakthrough in nonlinear narrative and sumptuous visuals. Following a personal breakdown in the late sixties, Kurosawa rebounded by expanding his dark brand of humanism into new stylistic territory, with films such as Kagemusha and Ran, visionary, color, epic ruminations on modern man and nature.