Ingmar Bergman

Sawdust and Tinsel

Sawdust and Tinsel

Ingmar Bergman presents the battle of the sexes as a ramshackle, grotesque carnival in Sawdust and Tinsel, one of the late master's most vivid early works. The story of the charged relationship between a turn-of-the-century traveling circus owner (Ake Grönberg) and his performer girlfriend (Harriet Andersson), the film features dreamlike detours and twisted psychosexual power plays that presage the director's Smiles of a Summer Night and The Seventh Seal, works that would soon change the landscape of art cinema forever.

Film Info

  • Ingmar Bergman
  • Sweden
  • 1953
  • 92 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • Swedish
  • Spine #412

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer of the film, featuring five minutes of material not included in previous U.S. editions
  • Audio commentary by Bergman scholar Peter Cowie
  • Video introduction by Bergman from 2003
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A new essay by critic John Simon and an appreciation by filmmaker Catherine Breillat

New cover by Sarah Habibi

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer of the film, featuring five minutes of material not included in previous U.S. editions
  • Audio commentary by Bergman scholar Peter Cowie
  • Video introduction by Bergman from 2003
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A new essay by critic John Simon and an appreciation by filmmaker Catherine Breillat

New cover by Sarah Habibi

Sawdust and Tinsel
Cast
Åke Grönberg
Albert Johansson
Harriet Andersson
Anne
Hasse Ekman
Frans
Anders Ek
Teodor Frost
Gudrun Brost
Alma, his wife
Annika Tretow
Agda, Albert's wife
Erik Strandmark
Jens
Gunnar Björnstrand
Mr. Sjuberg
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Screenplay
Ingmar Bergman
Cinematography
Sven Nykvist
Cinematography
Hilding Bladh
Music
Karl-Birger Blomdahl
Set designer
Bibi Lindström
Costumes
Mago
Sound
Olle Jakobsson
Editing
Carl-Olov Skeppstedt
Production manager
Lars-Owe Carlberg
Executive producer
Rune Waldekranz

From The Current

Mirrors of Bergman
Mirrors of Bergman

Filmmaker :: kogonada, with a little help from Sylvia Plath, reflects on women and mirrors in the films of Ingmar Bergman, in this exclusive new video essay.

By Kogonada

On Film / Visual Analysis — Feb 12, 2015
Scenes from a Director’s Life

He created some of film’s most dramatic moments, and his own experiences are about to become the stuff of drama. A series based on the life and career of Ingmar Bergman is currently in development for Swedish television, to be scripted by Swedish c…


Dec 23, 2009
Sawdust and Tinsel: Awakening

Sawdust and Tinsel: Awakening

In 2003, on the occasion of the Cinémathèque française’s complete retrospective of Ingmar Bergman’s work, ten filmmakers were invited to present one of his films that had a significant effect on them. Controversial French director Catherine Br…

By Catherine Breillat

On Film / Essays — Nov 20, 2007
Sawdust and Tinsel: The Lower Depths

Sawdust and Tinsel: The Lower Depths

Ingmar Bergman made some outstanding films before Sawdust and Tinsel (1953). But that film, released in America under the meretricious title The Naked Night—and known in Sweden as The Clown’s Evening—was the first that no other director could h…

By John Simon

On Film / Essays — Nov 20, 2007

Explore

Ingmar Bergman

Writer, Director

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.