Oscar Micheaux

Body and Soul

Body and Soul

Although the 1920s brought him acclaim as a stage actor and singer, Paul Robeson still had to prove himself as a viable screen performer. Mainstream avenues were limited, however, and his first films were made on the peripheries of the film business. Body and Soul, directed by the legendary African American filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, is a direct critique of the power of the cloth, casting Robeson in dual roles as a jackleg preacher and a well-meaning inventor.

Film Info

  • Oscar Micheaux
  • United States
  • 1925
  • 79 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  • Spine #371

Special Features

  • New, digital transfers of Body and Soul and Borderline created from the best surviving elements
  • Audio commentary for Body and Soul by Oscar Micheaux historian Pearl Bowser
  • Musical scores by jazz recording artists and composers Wycliffe Gordon (Body and Soul) and Courtney Pine (Borderline)
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing

Available In

Collector's Set

Paul Robeson: Portraits of the Artist

Paul Robeson: Portraits of the Artist

DVD Box Set

4 Discs

$79.96

Special Features

  • New, digital transfers of Body and Soul and Borderline created from the best surviving elements
  • Audio commentary for Body and Soul by Oscar Micheaux historian Pearl Bowser
  • Musical scores by jazz recording artists and composers Wycliffe Gordon (Body and Soul) and Courtney Pine (Borderline)
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
Body and Soul
Cast
Paul Robeson
Reverend Jenkins/Sylvester
Mercedes Gilbert
Sister Martha
Julia Theresa Russell
Isabelle
Lawrence Chenault
Yellow "Curley" Hinds
Marshall Rodgers
Negro in business
Walter Cornick
Brother Amos, church elder
Chester A. Alexander
Deacon Simpkins
Lillian Johnson
Sis' Ca'line
Madame Robinson
Sis' Lucy
Credits
Director
Oscar Micheaux
Directed, written, and produced by
Oscar Micheaux

From The Current

Paul Robeson: A Modern Man

Called by some the Great Forerunner and others the Tallest Tree in Our Forest, Paul Robeson is without peer in the annals of modern American civilization. His was a life rich with intellectual and emotional complexity and poignancy, unfolding during

By Clement Alexander Price

/
Another Oscar

“Around the time that the KKK rode to victory in The Birth of a Nation (1915), Al Jolson applied burned cork to his face in The Jazz Singer (1927), and scores of African-American actors bowed, scraped, shucked, and jived in Hollywood productions, a