Masaki Kobayashi

Samurai Rebellion

Samurai Rebellion

Toshiro Mifune stars as Isaburo Sasahara, an aging swordsman living a quiet life until his clan lord orders that his son marry the lord's mistress, who has recently displeased the ruler. Reluctantly, father and son take in the woman, and, to the family’s surprise, the young couple fall in love. But the lord soon reverses his decision and demands the mistress’s return. Against all expectations, Isaburo and his son refuse, risking the destruction of their entire family. Director Masaki Kobayashi's Samurai Rebellion is the gripping story of a peaceful man who finally decides to take a stand against injustice.

Film Info

  • Masaki Kobayashi
  • Japan
  • 1967
  • 121 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 2.35:1
  • Japanese
  • Spine #310

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Excerpt from a 1993 interview with director Masaki Kobayashi
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: a new essay by Japanese-film historian Donald Richie
    New cover by Eric Skillman

Purchase Options

Collector's Sets

Collector's Set

Rebel Samurai: Sixties Swordplay Classics

Rebel Samurai: Sixties Swordplay Classics

DVD Box Set

4 Discs

$79.96

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Excerpt from a 1993 interview with director Masaki Kobayashi
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: a new essay by Japanese-film historian Donald Richie
    New cover by Eric Skillman
Samurai Rebellion
Cast
Toshiro Mifune
Isaburo Sasahara
Yoko Tsukasa
Lady Ichi
Go Kato
Yogoro Sasahara
Shigeru Koyama
Steward Takahashi
Masao Mishima
Chamberlain Yanase
Isao Yamagata
Shobei Tsuchiya
Tatsuyoshi Ehara
Bunzo Sasahara
Tatsuo Matsumura
Lord Matsudaira
Credits
Director
Masaki Kobayashi
Executive producer
Tomoyuki Tanaka
Screenplay
Shinobu Hashimoto
Original story
Yasuhiko Takiguchi
Cinematography
Kazuo Yamada
Music
Toru Takemitsu
Production design
Yoshiro Muraki

From The Current

Samurai Rebellion:
Kobayashi's Rebellion

When Samurai Rebellion premiered, on May 27, 1967, the original Japanese title was Joiuchi—hairyo tsuma shimatsu, which means something like Rebellion—Receive the Wife. This title indicates the two concerns of the film: the social impact of an un…

By Donald Richie


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Toshiro Mifune

Actor

Toshiro Mifune
Toshiro Mifune

Akira Kurosawa once said, “The ordinary Japanese actor might need ten feet of film to get across an impression. Toshiro Mifune needed only three feet.” The filmmaker certainly gave Mifune a lot of space, however: over the course of sixteen collaborations, the actor and the director created some of the most dynamic characters ever put on-screen, all marked by an intense physicality and a surprising tenderness. Kurosawa first took note of the handsome actor when Mifune was twenty-seven, during an open audition at Toho Studios; he was soon cast in Snow Trail (1947), a film Kurosawa wrote for director Senkichi Taniguchi. Just one year later, Kurosawa gave him the lead in Drunken Angel as a consumptive gangster. Mifune proceeded to inhabit a variety of deeply felt roles for Kurosawa, including an artist hounded by paparazzi (Scandal); a bandit who may or not be a rapist and murderer (Rashomon); a loose cannon ronin who reluctantly protects a village (Seven Samurai); an elderly patriarch terrified of a second nuclear attack (I Live in Fear); and, probably most iconically, the wily, shiftless samurai Yojimbo. Mifune is known for more than his work with Kurosawa; see him in Hiroshi Inagaki’s Oscar-winning Samurai Trilogy and Masaki Kobayashi’s Samurai Rebellion. But it is Kurosawa’s greatest films that are most unimaginable without Mifune’s bravado streaking across them like lightning. The pair parted ways professionally in 1965.