Ingmar Bergman

Scenes from a Marriage

Scenes from a Marriage

Scenes from a Marriage chronicles the many years of love and turmoil that bind Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson), tracking their relationship as it progresses through a number of successive stages: matrimony, infidelity, divorce, and subsequent partnerships. Originally conceived as a five-hour, six-part television miniseries, the film is also presented in its three-hour theatrical cut. Shot on 16 mm in intense, intimate close-ups by cinematographer Sven Nykvist and featuring flawless performances by Ullmann and Josephson, Bergman’s emotional X-ray reveals the intense joys and pains of a complex bond.

Film Info

  • Ingmar Bergman
  • Sweden
  • 1973
  • 297 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.33:1
  • Swedish
  • Spine #229

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfers of both the television version and the U.S. theatrical version of the film, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks on the Blu-ray
  • Interview with director Ingmar Bergman from 1986
  • Interviews from 2003 with actors Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson
  • Interview from 2003 with Bergman scholar Peter Cowie comparing the two versions of Scenes from a Marriage
  • Plus: An essay by author Phillip Lopate

Cover by Eric Skillman

Purchase Options

Collector's Sets

Collector's Set

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Blu-Ray Box Set

30 Discs

$149.97

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfers of both the television version and the U.S. theatrical version of the film, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks on the Blu-ray
  • Interview with director Ingmar Bergman from 1986
  • Interviews from 2003 with actors Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson
  • Interview from 2003 with Bergman scholar Peter Cowie comparing the two versions of Scenes from a Marriage
  • Plus: An essay by author Phillip Lopate

Cover by Eric Skillman

Scenes from a Marriage
Cast
Liv Ullmann
Marianne
Erland Josephson
Johan
Bibi Andersson
Katarina
Jan Malmsjö
Peter
Gunnel Lindblom
Eva
Wenche Foss
Mother
Anita Wall
TV reporter
Barbro Hiort af Ornäs
Mrs. Jacobi
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Written and directed by
Ingmar Bergman
Cinematography
Sven Nykvist
Assistant camera
Lars Karlsson
Wardrobe
Inger Pehrsson
Makeup
Cecilia Drott
Editing
Siv Lundgren
Script girl
Ulla Stattin
Sound
Owe Svensson
Production supervisor
Lars-Owe Carlberg

From The Current

Undressing Souls in Scenes from a Marriage
Undressing Souls in Scenes from a Marriage

What does it take for actors to be completely vulnerable with each other? Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson reflect on the close friendship that informed their work in one of Ingmar Bergman’s most ambitious dramas.

Scenes from a Marriage: Natural Antagonists

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Scenes from a Marriage: Natural Antagonists

With uncharacteristic warmth and affection for human frailty, Ingmar Bergman raises the question of how love can possibly last forever.

By Phillip Lopate

Liv Ullmann and Bibi Andersson, Sisters in the Art

Ingmar’s Actors

Liv Ullmann and Bibi Andersson, Sisters in the Art

The powerhouse actors at the center of Persona became two of Ingmar Bergman’s most essential collaborators, bringing a remarkable emotional range to their performances.

Sean Baker’s Top 10
The Fierce Candor of Bibi Andersson

Flashbacks

The Fierce Candor of Bibi Andersson

The author recalls his encounters with the great Swedish actress.

By Peter Cowie

Explore

Ingmar Bergman

Writer, Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.