Ingmar Bergman

A Ship to India

A Ship to India

The hunchbacked sailor Johannes (Birger Malmsten) longs to escape his home on a salvage ship helmed by his cruel, drunken father (Holger Löwenadler)—and so does the captain himself, who is slowly going blind and planning to leave his wife and son for a music-hall performer named Sally (Gertrud Fridh). The family begins to unravel when the captain invites Sally to live on the ship, where she and Johannes form a tender connection. Told in flashback and inspired in part by French poetic realism, A Ship to India marks a major evolution in Ingmar Bergman’s early filmmaking, demonstrating his gifts as a conjurer of beguiling images and a dramatist of lacerating emotions.

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Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

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$239.96

A Ship to India
Cast
Holger Löwenadler
Captain Alexander Blom
Anna Lindahl
Alice Blom
Birger Malmsten
Johannes Blom
Gertrud Fridh
Sally
Naemi Briese
Selma
Hjördis Petterson
Sofi
Lasse Krantz
Hans
Jan Molander
Bertil
Erik Hell
Pekka
Åke Fridell
Variety hall owner
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Producer
Lorens Marmstedt
Based on the play by
Martin Söderhjelm
Cinematographer
Göran Strindberg
Editor
Tage Holmberg
Art director
P. A. Lundgren
Production manager
Allan Ekelund
Music
Erland von Koch
Sound
Lars Nordberg
Sound
Sven Josephson

From The Current

Crisis and A Ship to India: Bergman in the Making

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Crisis and A Ship to India: Bergman in the Making

Two early works by Ingmar Bergman show the Swedish master grappling with the conventions of melodrama, which would go on to influence his later explorations of spiritual torment.

By Christine Smallwood

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Ingmar Bergman

Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.