Ingmar Bergman

The Touch

The Touch

With his first English-language film, a critical and box-office disaster, Ingmar Bergman delivered a compelling portrait of conflicting desires. In The Touch, a chance encounter between seemingly contented housewife Karin (Bibi Andersson) and David (Elliott Gould), an intense American archaeologist scarred by his family’s past, leads to the initiation of a torrid and tempestuous affair, one that eventually threatens the stability of Karin’s marriage to a respected local surgeon (Max von Sydow). Upon its release, the filmmaker declared this emotionally complex and sensitively performed film to be his first real love story.

Film Info

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Collector's Set

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Blu-Ray Box Set

30 Discs

$239.96

The Touch
Cast
Elliott Gould
David Kovac
Bibi Andersson
Karin Vergerus
Max von Sydow
Andreas Vergerus
Sheila Reid
Sara Kovac
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Producer
Ingmar Bergman
Producer
Lars-Owe Carlberg
Cinematographer
Sven Nykvist
Music
Carl Michael
Music
Peter Covent
Music
Jan Johansson
Editor
Siv Lundgren
Production design
Ann-Christin Lobråten
Production design
P. A. Lundgren
Costume design
Mago
Costume design
Ethel Sjöholm
Makeup
Cecilia Drott
Makeup
Bengt Ottekil
Assistant director
Arne Carlsson

From The Current

The Touch and The Serpent’s Egg: Foreign Tongues

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

The Touch and The Serpent’s Egg: Foreign Tongues

Critically maligned upon their release, Ingmar Bergman’s only two English-language films show the master’s artistry at its most restrained and its most convoluted.

By Karan Mahajan

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The Looming Gravitas of Max von Sydow

Ingmar’s Actors

The Looming Gravitas of Max von Sydow

Ingmar Bergman scholar Peter Cowie explores how the great actor’s authoritative screen presence allowed him to embody the director’s fears and ideals.

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Ingmar Bergman

Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.