Steven Soderbergh

Gray’s Anatomy

Gray’s Anatomy

One of the great raconteurs of stage and screen, Spalding Gray, came together with one of cinema’s boldest image-makers, Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh, for Gray’s Anatomy, a spellbinding adaptation of Gray’s 1993 monologue of the same name (cowritten with Renée Shafransky). In it, Gray, with typical sardonic relish, chronicles his arduous journey through the diagnosis and treatment of a rare and alarming ocular condition. For the monologist, this experience occasioned a meditation on illness and mortality, medicine and metaphysics; for the filmmaker, it was a chance to experiment with ways of bringing his subject’s words to brilliant, eye-opening life.

Film Info

  • Steven Soderbergh
  • United States
  • 1997
  • 79 minutes
  • Color
  • Black & White
  • 1.85:1
  • English
  • Spine #618

Special Features

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New high definition digital transfer, supervised by director Steven Soderbergh, with a remastered 5.1 mix presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray edition
  • New interviews with Soderbergh and monologue cowriter Renée Shafransky
  • A Personal History of the American Theater, a ninety-five-minute monologue by Spalding Gray, originally produced by the Wooster Group in 1980 and videotaped in 1982
  • Swimming to the Macula, sixteen minutes of footage from Gray's actual eye surgery
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film critic Amy Taubin

New cover by Neil Kellerhouse

Purchase Options

Special Features

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New high definition digital transfer, supervised by director Steven Soderbergh, with a remastered 5.1 mix presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray edition
  • New interviews with Soderbergh and monologue cowriter Renée Shafransky
  • A Personal History of the American Theater, a ninety-five-minute monologue by Spalding Gray, originally produced by the Wooster Group in 1980 and videotaped in 1982
  • Swimming to the Macula, sixteen minutes of footage from Gray's actual eye surgery
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film critic Amy Taubin

New cover by Neil Kellerhouse

Gray’s Anatomy
Cast
Spalding Gray
Credits
Director
Steven Soderbergh
Writer
Spalding Gray
Based on the monologue by
Spalding Gray
Based on the monologue by
Renée Shafransky
Executive producer
Jonathan Sehring
Executive producer
Caroline Kaplan
Executive producer
Kathleen Russo
Producer
John Hardy
Editing
Susan Littenberg
Camera
Elliot Davis

From The Current

Swimming to the Macula
Swimming to the Macula

As is evident from his intensely personal theater and film work, Spalding Gray always laid himself bare to his audiences. But it’s unlikely you’ll ever get more up close and personal than with the following footage of the man’s eye surgery. …

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Gray’s Anatomy: The Eyes of the Beholder
Gray’s Anatomy: The Eyes of the Beholder

Theater’s ultimate autobiographer, Spalding Gray, and cinema’s invisible-man auteur, Steven Soderbergh, teamed up for an eye-opening movie monologue.

By Amy Taubin

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Shades of Gray
Shades of Gray

Tonight we salute the unique gifts of actor and monologue artist Spalding Gray, whose solo performance pieces inspired soaring flights of cinema like Jonathan Demme’s Swimming to Cambodia and the two Steven Soderbergh films that make up our double …

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Steven Soderbergh

Director

In 1989, when he was twenty-six, Steven Soderbergh became the youngest director ever to win the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. What’s more, he received the honor for his debut, the intense character study sex, lies, and videotape. Soderbergh spent the decade after this auspicious arrival trying out many different kinds of films, from intriguingly off-kilter studio projects like King of the Hill (1993) and Out of Sight (1998) to independent experiments like Schizopolis (1996) and Gray’s Anatomy (1996). Even after winning an Academy Award for the epic Traffic (2000) and continuing to work on bigger-budget Hollywood films like Ocean’s Eleven (2001), this high-profile filmmaker has never lost his drive to make compelling independent cinema, whether large-scale (2008’s Che) or small (2010’s And Everything Is Going Fine).