• France
  • 1943
  • 110 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • French
  •  

A shimmering glass hotel at the top of a remote Provençal mountain provides the setting for a tragicomic tapestry about an obsessive love pentangle, whose principals range from an artist to a hotel manager to a dam worker. Scripted by Jacques Prévert and Pierre Laroche, the film was banned from theaters for the duration of the occupation for its dark portrayal of the hedonistic excesses of the ruling class. Today, it is often singled out as Jean Grémillon’s greatest achievement.

Film Essays

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Eclipse Series 34: Jean Grémillon During the Occupation

By Michael Koresky July 24, 2012

Trained as a musician, Jean Grémillon became one of French cinema’s most lyrical artists. His most beloved films were made during World War II. Read more »

Film Essays

Lumiere_550_020_current_thumbnail

Eclipse Series 34: Jean Grémillon During the Occupation

By Michael Koresky July 24, 2012

Trained as a musician, Jean Grémillon became one of French cinema’s most lyrical artists. His most beloved films were made during World War II. Read more »

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