Roman Polanski

Rosemary’s Baby

Rosemary’s Baby

Horrifying and darkly comic, Rosemary’s Baby was Roman Polanski’s Hollywood debut. This wildly entertaining nightmare, faithfully adapted from Ira Levin’s best seller, stars a revelatory Mia Farrow as a young mother-to-be who grows increasingly suspicious that her overfriendly elderly neighbors (played by Sidney Blackmer and an Oscar-winning Ruth Gordon) and self-involved husband (John Cassavetes) are hatching a satanic plot against her and her baby. In the decades of occult cinema that Polanski’s ungodly masterpiece has spawned, it has never been outdone for sheer psychological terror.

Film Info

  • Roman Polanski
  • United States
  • 1968
  • 136 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.85:1
  • English
  • Spine #630

Special Features

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New, restored digital transfer, approved by director Roman Polanski, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • New documentary featuring interviews with Polanski, actress Mia Farrow, and producer Robert Evans
  • Interview with author Ira Levin from a 1997 broadcast of Leonard Lopate’s public radio program New York and Company, about his 1967 novel, its sequel, and the film
  • Komeda, Komeda, a feature- length documentary on the life and work of jazz musician and composer Krzysztof Komeda, who wrote the score for Rosemary’s Baby
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by critic Ed Park; Levin’s afterword to the 2003 New American Library edition of his novel; and Levin’s rare, unpublished character sketches of the Woodhouses and floor plan of their apartment, created in preparation for the novel
    Cover based on a theatrical poster by Stephen Frankfurt

Purchase Options

Special Features

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION

  • New, restored digital transfer, approved by director Roman Polanski, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • New documentary featuring interviews with Polanski, actress Mia Farrow, and producer Robert Evans
  • Interview with author Ira Levin from a 1997 broadcast of Leonard Lopate’s public radio program New York and Company, about his 1967 novel, its sequel, and the film
  • Komeda, Komeda, a feature- length documentary on the life and work of jazz musician and composer Krzysztof Komeda, who wrote the score for Rosemary’s Baby
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by critic Ed Park; Levin’s afterword to the 2003 New American Library edition of his novel; and Levin’s rare, unpublished character sketches of the Woodhouses and floor plan of their apartment, created in preparation for the novel
    Cover based on a theatrical poster by Stephen Frankfurt
Rosemary’s Baby
Cast
Mia Farrow
Rosemary Woodhouse
John Cassavetes
Guy Woodhouse
Ruth Gordon
Minnie Castevet
Sidney Blackmer
Roman Castevet
Maurice Evans
Hutch
Ralph Bellamy
Dr. Sapirstein
Patsy Kelly
Laura-Louise
Elisha Cook, Jr.
Mr. Nicklas
Emmaline Henry
Elise Dunstan
Charles Grodin
Dr. Hill
Hanna Landy
Grace Cardiff
Philip Leeds
Dr. Shand
Credits
Director
Roman Polanski
Produced by
William Castle
From the novel by
Ira Levin
Screenplay
Roman Polanski
Production design
Richard Sylbert
Director of photography
William A. Fraker
Edited by
Sam O’Steen
Edited by
Bob Wyman
Music
Krzysztof T. Komeda
Associate producer
Dona Holloway

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Explore

John Cassavetes

Actor

John Cassavetes’ emotionally naked human dramas are benchmarks of American independent cinema. Having started out in New York as an actor, Cassavetes brought to his directorial efforts the same kinetic, heightened realism that marked his film and theater roles—a wily danger, the sense that at any moment things could explode from the inside. Shadows (1959), the first film he directed, self-financed for a mere $40,000, didn’t find much of an audience upon its small initial release, but it garnered Cassavetes some notice from critics (including a Venice Film Festival Critics Prize)—as well as studios, resulting in a couple of impersonal projects in the 1960s (Too Late Blues, A Child Is Waiting). He dove back into personal filmmaking later in the decade with the devastating domestic drama Faces (1968). Though hardly a crowd-pleaser, that film—made, like Shadows, wholly independently—was an art-house success, resulting in three Oscar nominations. From that point on, Cassavetes was synonymous with uncompromising, anti-studio American fare, working with a rotating cast of brilliant actors like Ben Gazzara, Seymour Cassel, and, of course, his wife, Gena Rowlands, to touch raw nerves with such films as A Woman Under the Influence (1974), The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976), and Opening Night (1976). Cassavetes died in 1989.