Ingmar Bergman

A Lesson in Love

A Lesson in Love

One of Ingmar Bergman’s most satisfying marital comedies, A Lesson in Love stars the droll and sparkling duo of Eva Dahlbeck and Gunnar Björnstrand as a couple deep into their married years and seeking fresh pastures. Björnstrand’s gynecologist falls for one of his patients (Yvonne Lombard), while his wife flounces off to Copenhagen to renew her fling with a sculptor (Åke Grönberg). Deftly interspersing scenes of farce with interludes of tranquil reflection, A Lesson in Love serves as an aperitif before the full-blown comic brilliance of Smiles of a Summer Night the following year.

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Collector's Set

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Blu-Ray Box Set

30 Discs

$239.96

A Lesson in Love
Cast
Eva Dahlbeck
Marianne Erneman
Gunnar Björnstrand
David Erneman
Yvonne Lombard
Susanne Verin
Harriet Andersson
Nix Erneman
Åke Grönberg
Carl-Adam
Olof Winnerstrand
Erneman
Birgitte Reimer
Lise
John Elfström
Sam
Renée Björling
Svea Erneman
Dagmar Ebbesen
Nurse Lisa
Sigge Fürst
Vicar
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Producer
Allan Ekelund
Cinematographer
Martin Bodin
Music
Dag Wirén
Editor
Oscar Rosander
Production design
P. A. Lundgren
Art direction
Ingmar Bergman
Makeup artist
Carl M. Lundh
Production manager
Allan Ekelund
Assistant director
Rolf Carlsten
Sound
Sven Hansen

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Eva Dahlbeck, a “Battleship of Femininity”

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Ingmar Bergman

Director

Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.