• United Kingdom
  • 1937
  • 82 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  •  

Robert Flaherty and Zoltán Korda shared best director honors at the Venice Film Festival for this charming translation of Rudyard Kipling’s Jungle Book story “Toomai of the Elephants.” A harmonious mix of its two filmmakers’ styles—Flaherty’s adeptness at ethnographic documentary meeting Korda’s taste for grand adventure—Elephant Boy also served as the breakthrough showcase for the thirteen-year-old Sabu, whose beaming performance as a young mahout leading the British on an expedition made him a major international star.

Cast

ToomaiSabu
FatherW. E. Holloway
PetersenWalter Hudd
Machua AppaAllan Jeayes
Rham LahlBruce Gordon
HunterD. J. Williams
CommissionerHyde White

Credits

DirectorRobert Flaherty and Zoltán Korda
ProducerAlexander Korda
Based on “Toomai of the Elephants” byRudyard Kipling
ScreenplayJohn Collier
Screenplay collaborationAkos Tolnay and Marcia De Silva
CinematographyOsmond Borradaile
EditorCharles Crichton
Original music byJohn Greenwood
Musical directorMuir Matheson

Film Essays

Current_junglebook_fgthumb_thumbnail

Eclipse Series 30: Sabu!

By Michael Koresky November 29, 2011

It’s hard to imagine a movie role more perfectly suited to the actor playing it than Toomai in Elephant Boy (1937), the part that made Selar Shaik—known as Sabu—one of the least likely . . . Read more »

10 Things I Learned

10 Things I Learned: Sabu!

By Michael Koresky December 20, 2011


Press Notes

Press Notes: Sabu!

December 14, 2011

“Viewers enchanted by The Thief of Bagdad will need little encouragement to sample more early film work by the remarkable actor Sabu,” writes Glenn Erickson for Turner Classic Movies. “Eclipse’s . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Current_junglebook_fgthumb_thumbnail

Eclipse Series 30: Sabu!

By Michael Koresky November 29, 2011

It’s hard to imagine a movie role more perfectly suited to the actor playing it than Toomai in Elephant Boy (1937), the part that made Selar Shaik—known as Sabu—one of the least likely . . . Read more »

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