• Japan
  • 1964
  • 150 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 2.35:1
  • Japanese
  •  
  • Spine #474

Sadako (Masumi Harukawa), cursed by generations before her and neglected by her common-law husband, falls prey to a brutal home intruder. But rather than become a victim, she forges a path to her own awakening. This disturbing and pitiless evocation of domestic drudgery and sexual violence is also a fascinating, unsentimental account of one woman’s determination. Filled with director Shohei Imamura’s characteristic flashbacks and dream sequences, Intentions of Murder is a gripping, audacious portrait of a woman coming into her own in a man’s world.

Cast

Sadako TakahashiMasumi Harukawa
Riichi TakahashiKô Nishimura
HiraokaShigeru Tsuyuguchi
Yoshiko MasudaYûko Kusunoki
Tadae TakahashiRanko Akagi
Eiji TamuraYasuo Itoga
Seizo TakahashiYoshi Kato
Kinu TakahashiTanie Kitabayashi
Seiichiro TakahashiKazuo Kitamura

Credits

DirectorShohei Imamura
ScreenplayKeiji Hasabe and Shohei Imamura
Based on a story byShinji Fujiwara
EditingMutsuo Tanji
CinematographyShinsaku Himeda
Art directionKimihiko Nakamura
MusicToshiro Mayuzumi
SoundKoshiro Jinbo

Disc Features

• New, restored high-definition digital transfer
• Conversation between Shohei Imamura and critic Tadao Sato about the film
• Interview with critic and historian Tony Rayns
• New and improved English subtitle translations
PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film critic James Quandt

Film Essays

Intentions of Murder: Eros and Civilization

By James Quandt May 20, 2009

Early in Shohei Imamura’s Intentions of Murder, the librarian Riichi distractedly peruses Herbert Marcuse’s Eros and Civilization while conversing with his clinging mistress, Yoshiko. One can . . . Read more »

Video


Film Essays

Intentions of Murder: Eros and Civilization

By James Quandt May 20, 2009

Early in Shohei Imamura’s Intentions of Murder, the librarian Riichi distractedly peruses Herbert Marcuse’s Eros and Civilization while conversing with his clinging mistress, Yoshiko. One can . . . Read more »

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