• Japan
  • 1936
  • 78 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Japanese
  •  

Hiroshi Shimizu’s endearing road movie follows the long and winding route of a sweet-natured bus driver—nicknamed Mr. Thank You for his constant exclamation to pedestrians who kindly step out of his way—traveling from rural Izu to Tokyo. Romance and comedy occur, and tragedy threatens his passengers, a virtual microcosm of depression-era Japan.

Cast

Mr. Thank YouKen Uehara
Woman in black collarMichiko Kuwano
Girl being soldMayumi Tsukiji
Girl's motherKaoru Futaba
Daughter of man who returned from TokyoSetsuko Shinobu
Gentleman with beardRyuji Ishiyama

Credits

DirectorHiroshi Shimizu
ScreenplayHiroshi Shimizu
CinematographyIsamu Aoki
MusicKeizo Horiuchi
SoundHaruo Dobashi and Kaname Hashimoto
Based on the story “Arigato” byYasunari Kawabata

Film Essays

Eclipse Series 15: Travels with Hiroshi Shimizu

By Michael Koresky March 16, 2009

JAPANESE GIRLS AT THE HARBOR: MAN OF THE PEOPLE It’s a fitting irony that director Hiroshi Shimizu preferred to make films about outsiders, since within the expanse of Japanese cinema history, . . . Read more »

Video

Play Mr_thank_you_still_video_still

Arigato!

November 24, 2011

Watch video »


Press Notes

Press Notes: Getting to Know Shimizu

April 01, 2009

More cheers for the rediscovery of Hiroshi Shimizu, in Eclipse Series 15, come from IFC.com’s Michael Atkinson (“Criterion does it again, rescuing a major filmmaker from the quicksand of . . . Read more »


Clippings

Shining a Light on Shimizu

March 16, 2009

Dave Kehr heralds the rediscovery of “the oceanic depth and diversity of Japanese cinema” in recent years, “thanks in no small part to home video,” in a lovely New York Times piece on the latest . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 15: Travels with Hiroshi Shimizu

By Michael Koresky March 16, 2009

JAPANESE GIRLS AT THE HARBOR: MAN OF THE PEOPLE It’s a fitting irony that director Hiroshi Shimizu preferred to make films about outsiders, since within the expanse of Japanese cinema history, . . . Read more »

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