Ivan the Terrible, Part I Film Still

Ivan the Terrible, Part I

Sergei Eisenstein

 
  • Soviet Union
  • 1944
  • 103 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Russian
  •  

Navigating the deadly waters of Stalinist politics, Eisenstein was able to film two parts of his planned trilogy about the troubled sixteenth-century tsar who united Russia. Visually stunning and powerfully acted, Ivan the Terrible charts the rise to power and descent into terror of this veritable dictator. Though pleased with the first installment, Stalin detested the portrait in the second film—with its summary executions and secret police—and promptly banned it.

Cast

Ivan the TerribleNikolai Cherkasov
Tsarina Anastasia RomanovnaLyudmila Tselikovskaya
Boyarina Efrosinia StaritskayaSerafima Birman
Vladimir Andreyevich StaritskyPavel Kadochnikov
Malyuta SkuratovMikhail Zharov
Alexei BasmanovAmvrosi Buchma
Fyodor BasmanovMikhail A. Kuznetsov
Prince Andrei KurbskyMikhail Nazvanov
Boyar Fyodor KolychevAndrei Abrikosov
Nikola, a simple beggarVsevolod Pudovkin

Credits

Disc Features

  • Multimedia essay on the history of Ivan the Terrible by Joan Neuberger, director of the Center for Soviet Studies at the University of Texas at Austin
  • Deleted scenes
  • Drawings and production stills
  • New English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition

Film Essays

Ivan the Terrible, Parts I and II

By J. Hoberman April 23, 2001

A majestic synthesis of disparate forms, Sergei Eisenstein’s final film seems to be as much a ballet or an opera or a moving painting (or a mutant kabuki show) as it is a movie. As elaborately . . . Read more »

Clippings

Summer Cineaste: Twenty- First-Century Cinephilia

June 01, 2010

Cineaste has unveiled its summer 2010 issue on its website, and it looks like a provocative one. Editor in chief Gary Crowdus has tackled the ongoing debate about what constitutes valid . . . Read more »


Dispatches


Film Essays

Ivan the Terrible, Parts I and II

By J. Hoberman April 23, 2001

A majestic synthesis of disparate forms, Sergei Eisenstein’s final film seems to be as much a ballet or an opera or a moving painting (or a mutant kabuki show) as it is a movie. As elaborately . . . Read more »