The Blood of a Poet Film Still

The Blood of a Poet

Jean Cocteau

 
  • France
  • 1930
  • 50 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • French
  •  
  • Spine #67

“Poets . . . shed not only the red blood of their hearts but the white blood of their souls,” proclaimed Jean Cocteau of his groundbreaking first film—an exploration of the plight of the artist, the power of metaphor and the relationship between art and dreams. One of cinema’s great experiments, this first installment of the Orphic Trilogy stretches the medium to its limits in an effort to capture the poet’s obsession with the struggle between the forces of life and death. Criterion is proud to present The Blood of a Poet (Le sang d’un poète).

Cast

StatueLee Miller
PoetEnrique Rivero
Louis XV FriendJean Desbordes
Black AngelFéral Benga

Credits

DirectorJean Cocteau
Settings, montage, and commentary byJean Cocteau
MusicGeorges Auric
Technical directorMichael J. Arnaud
CinematographyGeorges Périnal
SoundHenri Labrély
Sound effectsR.C.A. Photophone
Set decorationJean d'Eaubonne
Orchestra conducted byEdouard Flament
Accessories byMaison Berthelin
Plaster casts byPlastikos

Disc Features

  • New digital transfer, with restored sound
  • New English subtitle translation
  • A collection of rare behind-the-scenes photos
  • Edgardo Cozarinsky’s renowned 66-minute 1984 documentary Cocteau: Autoportrait d’un Inconnu (Autobiography of an Unknown)
  • A transcript of Cocteau’s lecture given at a 1932 screening of Blood of a Poet, and a 1946 essay by Cocteau
  • A Cocteau bibliofilmography

Film Essays

The Blood of a Poet

By Jean CocteauApril 24, 2000

PREFACE (1946) “Most of Aesop’s fables have many different levels and meanings. There are . . . Read more »

Press Notes

Press Notes: Vampyr Resurrected

September 11, 2008

“Before there were Luis Buñuel, Robert Bresson, Ingmar Bergman, or Andrei Tarkovsky (not to . . . Read more »


Film Essays

The Blood of a Poet

By Jean CocteauApril 24, 2000

PREFACE (1946) “Most of Aesop’s fables have many different levels and meanings. There are . . . Read more »