• United States
  • 1951
  • 84 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  •  

The Steel Helmet marked Samuel Fuller’s official arrival as a mighty cinematic force. Despite its relatively low budget, this portrait of Korean War soldiers dealing with moral and racial identity crises remains one of the director’s most gripping, realistic depictions of the blood and guts of war, as well as a reflection of Fuller’s irreducible social conscience. So controversial were the film’s comments on domestic and war crimes (American bigotry, the Japanese-American WWII internment camps) that Fuller became the target of an FBI investigation.

Cast

Sergeant ZackGene Evans
Private "Conchie" BronteRobert Hutton
Lieutenant DriscollSteve Brodie
Corporal ThompsonJames Edwards
Sergeant "Buddha-Head" TanakaRichard Loo
Joe, Second GISid Melton
Private BaldyRichard Monahan
The RedHarold Fong
First GINeyle Morrow

Credits

DirectorSamuel Fuller
ScreenplaySamuel Fuller
ProducerSamuel Fuller
CinematographyErnest Miller
EditingPhilip Cahn
Associate producerWilliam Berke
Art directionTheobold Holsopple
MusicPaul Dunlap

Film Essays

Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller

By Nick Pinkerton August 13, 2007

Instead of calling “Action!” Samuel Fuller discharged a Colt .45 in the air. It was the first scene he had ever directed, on the set of I Shot Jesse James (1949), and he knew the importance of a . . . Read more »

Book Notes

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Juice, with Lots of Pulp: Samuel Fuller’s Brainquake

By Michael Atkinson November 05, 2014

A review of the American auteur’s posthumously published novel Read more »


Book Notes

Me and Sam Fuller

By Lisa Dombrowski December 29, 2008

It is a good time to belong to the cult of Fuller. Those of us who consider ourselves members never forget our moment of induction. Some enlisted when his films first hit the screen—lucky enough . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller

By Nick Pinkerton August 13, 2007

Instead of calling “Action!” Samuel Fuller discharged a Colt .45 in the air. It was the first scene he had ever directed, on the set of I Shot Jesse James (1949), and he knew the importance of a . . . Read more »