Six Moral Tales

Six Moral Tales

 
Six Moral Tales (Criterion DVD)

DVD Box Set

6 Discs

SRP: $99.95

Criterion Store price:$79.96

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Box Set Info

  • Spine #342

The multifaceted, deeply personal dramatic universe of Eric Rohmer has had an effect on cinema unlike any other. One of the founding critics of the history-making Cahiers du cinéma, Rohmer began translating his written manifestos to film in the sixties, standing apart from his New Wave contemporaries, like François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, with his patented brand of gently existential, hyperarticulate character studies set against vivid seasonal landscapes. This near genre unto itself was established with his audacious and wildly influential series “Six Moral Tales.” A succession of jousts between fragile men and the women who tempt them, the “Six Moral Tales” unleashed onto the film world a new voice, one that was at once sexy, philosophical, modern, daring, nonjudgmental, and liberating.

Collector’s Set Includes

The Bakery Girl of Monceau box cover

The Bakery Girl of Monceau

Eric Rohmer 1963

In the first of Rohmer’s “Moral Tales,” a law student (Barbet Schroeder) with a roving eye and a large appetite stuffs himself full of sugar cookies and pastries daily in order to garner the attentions of the pretty brunette who works in a quaint Paris bakery.


Suzanne’s Career box cover

Suzanne’s Career

Eric Rohmer 1963

In Rohmer’s second “Moral Tale,” Bertrand bides his time in a casually hostile and envious friendship with college chum Guillaume. But when ladies’ man Guillaume seems to be making a play for the spirited, independent Suzanne, Bertrand watches bitterly with disapproval and jealousy.


My Night at Maud’s box cover

My Night at Maud’s

Eric Rohmer 1969

In the brilliantly accomplished centerpiece of Rohmer’s “Moral Tales” series, Jean-Louis Trintignant plays Jean-Louis, a pious Catholic engineer who unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of the bold, brunette divorcée Maud, where his rigid ethical standards are challenged.


La collectionneuse box cover

La collectionneuse

Eric Rohmer 1967

In Rohmer’s first color film, a bombastic, womanizing art dealer and his painter friend go to a seventeenth-century villa on the Riviera for a relaxing summer getaway. But their idyll is disturbed by the presence of the bohemian Haydée, accused of being a “collector” of men.


Claire’s Knee box cover

Claire’s Knee

Eric Rohmer 1970

“Why would I tie myself to one woman if I were interested in others?” says Jerôme, even as he plans on marrying a diplomat’s daughter by summer’s end. Before then, Jerôme spends his July at a lakeside boardinghouse nursing crushes on the sixteen-year-old Laura and her blonde stepsister, Claire.


Love in the Afternoon box cover

Love in the Afternoon

Eric Rohmer 1972

In the luminous final chapter to Rohmer’s “Moral Tales,” the bourgeois business executive Frédéric, though happily married to an adoring wife, cannot banish from his mind the multitude of attractive Parisian women who pass him every day. Then arrives Chloé, an audacious, unencumbered old flame.

Disc Features

SPECIAL DELUXE EDITION SIX-DISC BOX SET

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfers, supervised and approved by director Eric Rohmer
  • Exclusive new video conversation between Rohmer and Barbet Schroeder
  • Rohmer short films: Presentation, or Charlotte and Her Steak (1951); Nadja in Paris (1964); A Modern Coed (1966); The Curve (1999); and Véronique and Her Dunce (1958)
  • “On Pascal” (1965), an episode of the educational TV series En profil dans le texte directed by Rohmer, on the French philosopher Blaise Pascal, the subject of debate in My Night at Maud’s
  • Archival interviews with Rohmer, actors Jean-Claude Brialy, Béatrice Romand, Laurence de Monaghan, and Jean-­Louis Trintignant, film critic Jean Douchet, and producer Pierre Cottrell
  • Video afterword by filmmaker and writer Neil LaBute
  • Original theatrical trailers
  • New and improved English subtitle translations
  • PLUS: Six Moral Tales, the original stories by Eric Rohmer, and a booklet featuring Rohmer’s landmark essay “For a Talking Cinema,” excerpts from cinematographer Nestor Almendros’s autobiography, and new essays by Geoff Andrew, Ginette Vincendeau, Phillip Lopate, Kent Jones, Molly Haskell, and Armond White

    New covers by Rodrigo Corral