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My Top 20 Criterions

by MiloBOK

Created 04/30/17

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I don't necessarily own all of these in Criterion form as most of them aren't available in the UK but these are my favourite Criterion films that I've seen. Does feature some ties and is not 100% in a fixed order.

  • Has two of the best scenes in cinematic history. Godard is the master of cool, and Band of Outsiders is one of his best.

  • Few films are so weird and work as well as The Fisher King does. Gilliam's movie features excellent performances by Bridges and Robin Williams, fitting Arthurian Legend into New York City very well indeed.

  • One of those movies that improves with every rewatch. Also feels more and more timely as the years go by. Kubrick at his best.

  • A masterpiece of French New Wave Cinema. Truffaut is fantastic and The 400 Blows is a great character-centric film.

  • The ultimate film that takes place largely in one room, the smart dialogue and the great atmosphere created by this film makes it essential. This was the 1,000th film that I saw and it is one of the most memorable.

  • Fellini's 81/2 is a wonderful movie that needs to be seen, taking a very unique approach to an very interesting story.

  • Currently my first and only Bergman film that I've seen and I've never quite seen anything like Persona. It left a resounding impression on me and really blew me away as to just how unique it was.

  • I've seen four Charlie Chaplin films now but one that I keep coming back to is City Lights. It's fantastic, has one of the best endings in the history of Cinema and is just pure awesome.

  • My favourite film by the Coen brothers and a great performance by Oscar Isaac, Inside Llewyn Davis is an excellent movie that is one of the best films of the decade. A great character study, a fascinating atmosphere and some brilliant music makes this a must watch.

  • The ultimate Kurosawa movie. Its length may be daunting but it's worth every minute.

  • One of the first serial killer movies out there, M is a trailblazer and very unique in how well it is handled. The faux court room scene at the end is fantastic, and Peter Lorre is nothing short of incredible.

  • One of the coolest movies ever made, Tokyo Drifter is a great Japanese mob movie that instantly leaves an impression. As there's no Blu-Ray available in the UK I really hope it gets released over here as part of Criterion soon!

  • John Woo's stylised brand of action is so cool and very awesome indeed. Plenty of slow-motion scenes don't slow down this raw, over the top, gritty action film that is one of the best in the genre.

  • A masterpiece.

  • I love this movie. It's one of my favourite Italian films, has a great Ennio Morricone score and benefits from a terrific performance by Gian Maria Volonte who plays the unhinged Italian Police Inspector very well. The ending is particularly chilling.

  • Another really chilling movie that was for some reason critically panned on release, The Night of the Hunter is a haunting, unnerving film that is one of the best of its genre. Robert Mitchum is fantastic.

  • This and Inside Llewyn Davis are my two favourite films of the decade so far. Baumbach's comedy is great, Gerwig is superb and the scene set to David Bowie's Modern Love is one of my favourites.

  • Richard Linklater is a master and Dazed and Confused might well be his best film. Endlessly rewatchable.

  • Film_654w_repoman_w160

    15. (tie)
    Repo Man

    Alex Cox

    Sometimes you just want to have a good time with films and Repo Man was very much that for me. It's like Cox threw everything he wanted to into this movie and surprisingly, it sticks.

  • Adam Sandler has got a reputation of being in awful movies, perhaps rightly so. This is his best film by far thanks to the excellent direction of Paul Thomas Anderson. I've only seen this once and I can't wait to rewatch it.

  • I was lucky enough to see this at the Cinema for a second viewing upon a UK Re-Release and it's still just as brilliant and twisted the second time around. Haunting, mystifying and confusing, Lynch's Mulholland Drive is a masterpiece and one of the best films of the 21st Century.

  • Even creepier than Mulholland Drive, Eraserhead is weird and messed up, but very awesome. A remarkable debut for Lynch.

  • del Toro's best film. An incredibly captivating work of dark fantasy with some excellent set and creature design. Wonderfully majestic, this is how you make a horror movie.

  • A raw, powerful and harrowing story set in 17th Century Japan, exploring the titular life of Oharu, a woman who falls from grace. Hard to watch, this film is still utterly worth it and essential viewing.

  • A richly complex, multi-layered drama that is fascinating to watch.

  • Taking the unusual approach of singing its dialogue through the entire movie, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg uses its colours very well to tell a captivating story that doesn't play out how you'd expect to, boasting a really powerful ending and has a clear influence over Damien Chazelle's wonderful La La Land.

  • Far more than just its controversial erotic scenes, Blue is the Warmest Color is a powerful character driven drama that really benefits from some great performances.

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