François Truffaut

Bed and Board

Bed and Board

The fourth installment in François Truffaut’s chronicle of the ardent, anachronistic Antoine Doinel, Bed and Board plunges his hapless creation once again into crisis. Expecting his first child and still struggling to find steady employment, Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud) involves himself in a relationship with a beautiful Japanese woman that threatens to destroy his marriage. Lightly comic, with a touch of the burlesque, Bed and Board is a bittersweet look at the travails of young married life and the fine line between adolescence and adulthood.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Rare behind-the-scenes footage with Truffaut at work on the Bed and Board set, and being interviewed along with actress Claude Jade
  • Excerpt from the 1970 TV program Cinéastes de notre temps: François Truffaut, dix ans dix films, in which Truffaut and co-writer Bernard Revon reveal their methods for generating scripts and developing ideas
  • Rare television interview with Jean-Pierre Léaud discussing his feelings about Truffaut and Antoine Doinel, and his thoughts about "ending" the series
  • Excerpt from the 1972 documentary Approches du cinéma: François Truffaut ou la nouvelle vague, in which Truffaut addresses the complexities of Antoine Doinel
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

Available In

Collector's Set

The Adventures of Antoine Doinel

The Adventures of Antoine Doinel

DVD Box Set

5 Discs

$79.96

Out Of Print

Special Features

  • New digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Rare behind-the-scenes footage with Truffaut at work on the Bed and Board set, and being interviewed along with actress Claude Jade
  • Excerpt from the 1970 TV program Cinéastes de notre temps: François Truffaut, dix ans dix films, in which Truffaut and co-writer Bernard Revon reveal their methods for generating scripts and developing ideas
  • Rare television interview with Jean-Pierre Léaud discussing his feelings about Truffaut and Antoine Doinel, and his thoughts about "ending" the series
  • Excerpt from the 1972 documentary Approches du cinéma: François Truffaut ou la nouvelle vague, in which Truffaut addresses the complexities of Antoine Doinel
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
Bed and Board
Cast
Jean-Pierre Léaud
Antoine Doinel
Claude Jade
Christine Doinel
Madamoiselle Hiroko
Kyoko
Barbara Laage
Monique
Danièle Girard
Ginette
Claire Duhamel
Madame Darbon
Daniel Ceccaldi
Monsieur Darbon
Daniel Boulanger
The tenor
Silvana Blasi
The tenor's wife
Credits
Director
François Truffaut
Screenplay
François Truffaut
Screenplay
Bernard Revon
Screenplay
Claude de Givray
Music
Antoine Duhamel
Cinematography
Nestor Almendros
Camera operator
Emmanuel Machuel
Editing
Agnès Guillemot
Assistant editor
Yann Dedet
Assistant editor
Martine Kalfon
Producer
Marcel Berbert
Assistant director
Suzanne Schiffman
Assistant director
Jean-François Stévenin
Sound
René Levert

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Flashbacks

Letters from Truffaut

The author recalls his encounters and correspondence with the filmmaker.

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François Truffaut

Writer, Director

François Truffaut
François Truffaut

A lifelong cinephile, François Truffaut first made his cinematic mark as a fiery, contentious critic for Cahiers du cinéma in the 1950s, denouncing the French film industry's bloated "tradition of quality" and calling for the director to be redefined as the auteur, or individual author, of the film. Truffaut then became an auteur himself, starting with The 400 Blows, which won him the best director award at Cannes and led the French new-wave charge. The 400 Blows remains Truffaut’s seminal film, yet he continued to reinvigorate cinema throughout the sixties, with such thrilling works as Shoot the Piano Player and Jules and Jim. Truffaut also continued to follow the adventures of 400 Blows protagonist Antoine Doinel—embodied by Jean-Pierre Léaud—through the seventies (Stolen Kisses, Bed and Board, Love on the Run), while directing such other classics as Day for Night and The Last Metro, which displayed his undying love for cinema and life. His own life was tragically cut short at the age of fifty-two.