Robert Altman

3 Women

3 Women

In a dusty, underpopulated California resort town, a naive southern waif, Pinky Rose (Sissy Spacek), idolizes and befriends her fellow nurse, the would-be sophisticate and “thoroughly modern” Millie Lammoreaux (Shelley Duvall). When Millie takes Pinky in as her roommate, Pinky’s hero worship evolves into something far stranger and more sinister than either could have anticipated. Featuring brilliant performances from Spacek and Duvall, this dreamlike masterpiece from Robert Altman careens from the humorous to the chilling to the surreal, resulting in one of the most unusual and compelling films of the 1970s.

Film Info

  • Robert Altman
  • United States
  • 1977
  • 124 minutes
  • Color
  • 2.35:1
  • English
  • Spine #230

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary featuring director Robert Altman
  • Galleries of rare production and publicity stills
  • Original theatrical trailers and television spots
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • PLUS: A new essay by critic David Sterritt

New cover by Michael Boland

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary featuring director Robert Altman
  • Galleries of rare production and publicity stills
  • Original theatrical trailers and television spots
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • PLUS: A new essay by critic David Sterritt

New cover by Michael Boland

3 Women
Cast
Shelley Duvall
Millie Lammoreaux
Sissy Spacek
Pinky Rose
Janice Rule
Willy Hart
Robert Fortier
Edgar Hart
Ruth Nelson
Mrs. Rose
John Cromwell
Mr. Rose
Sierra Pecheur
Ms. Bunweill
Craig Richard Nelson
Dr. Maas
Maysie Hoy
Doris
Belita Moreno
Alcira
Leslie Ann Hudson
Polly
Patricia Ann Hudson
Peggy
Credits
Director
Robert Altman
Writer
Robert Altman
Producer
Robert Altman
Director of photography
Chuck Rosher
Music
Gerald Busby
Editing
Dennis Hill
Art director
James D. Vance
Production executive / First assistant director
Tommy Thompson
Associate producer
Robert Eggenweiller
Associate producers
Scott Bushnell
Murals
Bodhi Wind

From The Current

A Different Kind of Logic: Rodarte on 3 Women
A Different Kind of Logic: Rodarte on 3 Women

The designers behind the celebrated fashion brand Rodarte talk about one of Robert Altman’s strangest films.

Jacqueline Novak and John Early’s Closet Picks
Jacqueline Novak and John Early’s Closet Picks

Shortly before the critically acclaimed success of their off-Broadway show Get on Your Knees, the two comedians stopped by for a few good laughs in our closet.

Rodarte’s Top 10

Explore

Robert Altman

Director, Writer, Producer

Robert Altman
Robert Altman

Few directors in recent American film history have gone through as many career ups and downs as Robert Altman did. Following years of television work, the rambunctious midwesterner set out on his own as a feature film director in the late 1950s, but didn’t find his first major success until 1970, with the antiauthoritarian war comedy M*A*S*H. Hoping for another hit just like it, studios hired him in the years that followed, most often receiving difficult, caustic, and subversive revisionist genre films. After the success of 1975’s panoramic American satire Nashville, Altman once again delved into projects that were more challenging, especially the astonishing, complex, Bergman-influenced 3 Women. Thereafter, Altman was out of Hollywood’s good graces, though in the eighties, a decade widely considered his fallow period, he came through with the inventive theater-to-film Nixon monologue Secret Honor and the TV miniseries political satire Tanner ’88. The double punch of The Player and the hugely influential ensemble piece Short Cuts brought him back into the spotlight, and he continued to be prolific in his output into 2006, when his last film, A Prairie Home Companion, was released months before his death at the age of eighty-one.